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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1926"

EX LIBP 



LIBRARY 
AUGUSTA COLLEGE 




5,C 



LIBRARY USE ONLY 

DATE DUE 


















































































































































GAYLORD 






PRrNTEOIN USA. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/maidsandman19261926stud 



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FOREVORD 

TN THE LONG AGO .WINGED 
lARGOSIES SAILED THE 
SEVEN SEAS IN QUEST OF 
THE UNKNOVN. 

TOD AY. VE LAUNCH THE 
TUBMAN ARGOSIES OF OUR 
DREAMS.IN THE HOPE THAT 
THEY WILL COME BACK TO 
HARBOR.LADEN WITH RICH 
BLESSINGS FOR THE FU- 
TURE OF OUR BELOVED 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL AND 
THE CITY OF AUGUSTA IN 
WHICH WE LIVE. 






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THE 1 926 

MAIDS AMD A IVIAN 



PUBUSUCD BV TUC STUDENTS'/ 

TUBMAIN NICU SCUOOL 




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~ 1926- 



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TOTiTf 



TO 

WILLAMETTE GREEM 

A LOYAL TRICND, A WISE 
COUNSELOR, AN INSPIRING 
PERSONALITY. WE DEDI - 
GATE TWIS VOLUME OE 
MAIDS AND A MAN 






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THE SCHOOL 

CLASSES 
ORGANIZAnONS 
ACIMTTES 
ATHLETICS 

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+ + 

T. H, Garrett ..Principal 

Miss A. Dorothy Hains.. - Latin 

Miss Ada G. AVoods English 

Miss Annie M. Page - - French 

Miss Julia A. Flisch - ..History 

Miss Gertrude J. .Comey. English 

Miss Willamette Green Mathematics 

Miss Marcia A. Clark Domestic Art 

Miss Lois Eve General Science 

Mrs. Mildred A. Ridgely ....Latin 

Miss Am a Lee Null Spanish 

Miss Eleanor M. Boat w right Hist or 1/ 

I\Iiss Nancy E. Haddock Domestic Science 

Miss Ann Braddy Mathematics 

Miss Marion Hamilton History 

Mrs. W. W. Snow French 

Miss Edith Nachman Geography 

Miss Helene A. Norwood Science 

Mrs. W. C. Lyeth Ma^licmatics and English 

Miss Dorothy- Halbert Music 

Mrs. Eliza T. Sandison English 

]Miss Mary E. Bryant Science and Mathematics 

Miss Frances E. Tuhb Commercial Snbjects 

JMiss Eliz.^beth Strayhorn Mathematics 

Miss Elizabeth Henry English and Latin 

ALss Bessie Mary Dudley English 

Miss Lor a M. Pearce English 

Miss Gladys Carson History 

Miss Celeste Wickliffe Physical Training 

Miss Grace L. Berry Physical Training 

Miss Mary' Gilliland — Mathematics 

Miss Stella Stephens 1 Mathematics 

Miss Dorothy Eloise Norris - Chemistry 

Miss Frances Fowler Commercial Art 

Miss Helen Horan Commercial Subjects 

Mrs. Mary M. Owens Librarian 

Miss Ann G. Smith Assistant Domestic Science 

Miss Louise Wilson ^..Secretary 



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Our tlioiiglits, we're told by those wlio know, 

Rejflect u})on our features. 
TlicyM eliange tlieir views, if tla v could see 

One of our ])oker-faecd tcacliers. 

A question's asked ; we start to s])eak 
Now arc we wrong or right? 
We scarcii iier face; slie may have tiiouglits, 
But they're certainly hid from sight ! 

Some Eastern king, when he built the Sjihinx, 

Was thinking of this case, 
And from boyhood days the model he took — 

HIS teacher with that poker-face! 

Maky FisKE, '26 



^^ntor (Siia&s Pn^nt 



•f + 

Some say that life is a book, and each jiage 
The story of happenings in wliich wc engage, 

In a sombrcor delicate hue. 
If this be true, then the pages of wliite 
That tell us of hours filled with deligl>t, 
Tiiat speak, too, of winning at last in the <ight. 

We've written, our Tubman, at you. 
Some say that life is a garden of flowers 
Which, toiling in sunshine, yet often in sliowors. 

We pluck as we pass through. 
If tiiis be true, then the roses most fair, 
The lilies most fragrant, the petals most rare, 
The sweetest of blossoms whose scent fills the air. 

We've gathered, our Tubman, from you. 
Some say that life is a I'oad long and wide, 
Where pleasures and pain greet us, each side by side 

And sadness and happiness too. 
If this be true, then the stretch of the road 
Where pleasures were sweetest, where lightest our load, 
Where joy was most often upon us bestowed. 

We've travelled, our Tubman, at yon. 

M.\RV FlSKE '26. 







Fifth Year 
+ -i- 

Motto — ''One for all, and all for one. 

Class Color.s— F(7(A- and White 
Cliiss Flower — Pink Hose Bud 



+ + 

WiLMiNA Rowland , j... .President 

Mary Fiske Vice-President 

Helen Dicks Secretary and Treasurer 



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- 1926- 






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EMMA LOUISE ARNOLD 
"The Life. Sentence." 
Emma's "Life Sentence"' is just about to come to an end. She is going to be pardoned 
by Mr. Garrett and will receive a "dip" for hard work well done. 

RUBY BANNESTER 
"A Court of Inquirii" 
Ruby follows the idea that if you don't know something, ask somebody else. Hence, the 
numerous questions — except on the subject of automobile w recks ! 

MARIAN ELIZABETH BATTEN 
"Flirwer of the North" 
Marian may be our "Flower of the North" but she's certainly not a "blooming idiot!" 
She chose the correct spot when she picked the "Garden City of the South" in which to 
transplant herself. 

MARGARET FRANCES BLAND 
".I Daufihter of the Land" 
Because Frances lives out in the country, we have chosen to call her "A Daughter 
of the Land." We have an inkling that she finds a great deal of pleasure in her rides to 
and fro in the school truck ? 

EVELYN VIRGINIA BURCH 
"The Up Hill Climb" 
Evelyn has been toiling on "The Up Hill Climb" with all the rest of us from the 
Sub-Freshman Class. It is in great part through her efforts that our class has reached the 
top in athletic events. 

ANN RUTH BURNETTE 
"Sia- Feet Four" 
Ruth is one of those lucky girls who always get to pull the windows down in Miss 
Tubb's class, thereby, missing half the lesson. We've heard that she is lucky in other more 
personal matters also. 



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- 1926- 







MAHCiAHKT THOMAS BL'SH 
"77if IKflnf/fCcc" 
Everybody likes Marjraret for her talkativeness as well as for her sense of luiiiior. 
She is always jroinj;, (thoufrh we don't Know where) and is ever ready to lend a liol})ing 
liand in all events. 

MVKTIS AMY CAXNOX 
"Thin Fffi'doni" 
"Mutt" says that slie's so u; ed to Tuhnian siie dmsn't know wluit she'll do with 
"This Freedom" she has grained by frradiirtinjf. We thinU lu r work as a stenoi_'ra])lier will 
soon oeciipy both her mind and time. 

FRANCES ELIZABETH CARI.YON 

"The (liiihliiga of Riaxon' 
Elizabeth got ler early traininfr in the power of reasoning in history class under 
Miss Fliseh. Later she showed her alnlity in this line in that stirring debate ".Marriage vs. 
Career." We wonder if F.lizalieth with licr wit and eliarni, will always favor a career — ? 

DOROTHY COOK 
"The air) of All Trades" 
Porothy seems to be able to do almost anything that is asked of her. She has been a 
credit not only to her class but to her various associates wliom she has assisted in every 
way jiossilile. 

MKI.VIS OTEI,L\ COHHITT 
"./ Weaver of Dreams" 
Fair .Maid ! We wonder what she is dreaming of as she gazes into space w ith that 
intent look iijion lier face. We hope ."^Dme day that all her (Ireanis will comic true. 

.MARGARET CULPKFPFH 
"Heart Throbs" 
We envy Margaret for her lovely blue eyes and genial di.'position. It is no wonder 
she has caused so countless many "Heart Throbs" to numbers of the opposite sex! 




MERYL CULPEPPER 
"Oh Doctor" 
Can you tell us what kind of heart trouble Meryl has and to whom she .goes for treat- 
ment? We wonder if it is serious since the treatment seems to take up so much of her time. 

MARGARET CURHIE 

■■77)f Maiitlr of Sllftire" 
Because Margaret doesn't say much, we all sit uj) and take notice when she does start 
speaking. During her years at Tuliman slie lias become noted for her sweet disposition and 
best of all — common sense. 

MARTHE SIBLEY D'ANTIGNAC 

■■The Little Fniich Girl" 
charm unlimited from her French ancestors, Marthe always brings 
'Gay Paree." We imagine that she could show the Parisians quite 



With vivacity and 
to our minds visions of 
a few new things. 



MILDRED JEAN DAVIDSON 

'■Free .lir" 
That Jean has a big mouth is shown by the fact that she has been our cheer leader for 
two years; that she has a big heart, is proven by her many friends. We hope that life holds 
many bargains for Jean! 

HELEN VIVIAN DICKS 

"(jentlemen Prefer lUinnlea" 
Helen is a living example of the fact that ' lientlemen Prefer Blondes," but she also 
exemplifies the fact that they aren't the only ones who do this, for she has earned the enduring 
love and respect of all just by her untiring efforts for the annual. 

CLEMMIE NETTE LOWNING 
"Love and Learn" 
This expresses perfectly Clemmie's attitude toward life — especially in the case of a 
certain young professional man, formerly of Augusta. It is also rumored that he is not the 
only one! 



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^ 1926 -- 



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LOI.LIE MAE DYKES 

"Polly" 
To her friends she is Icnown as "Lollypop"; at home her name is "Polly". But she Is 
known everywhere for her sweetness and even when she has still another name we'll always 
love her. 

LAURA FAIR 

"liri(/ht iiikI Fair" 
Laura certainly deserves this name. Her smile will brigliten tlie darlcest corner and 
there was never a fairer girl (in more ways than one) at Tubman. 

HELEN HOLLIS FENNELL 
"Dacl<li/-Luni/-Lef/s" 
How lucky some people are ! There's Helen, she'll never lo.se her head in a crowd but 
as for her heart — well, that is another matter. 

MARY CARLYOX FISKE 
"The Hunted Woman" 
If you ever want to know where Mary is, hunt for her at a meeting! Mary is always 
hunted down because of her efficiency and willingness to help. But from what we hear, 
Tubman does not monopolize all her time. 

VIRGINIA AYER FLEMING 

■■The Sport" 
What would Tubman (or even the world) be without its Virginia, always ready to help 
in everything? We h()])e she'll be as successful in all she undertakes as she is in making those 
locks of hers to curl so artistically! 

EI.OISE GORDON FULCHER 
■'The Teaser" 
Eloise is a typical little teaser; in otlu-r words, she is little l)ut loud. Eloise is striving 
mighty hard for her "dip" and we're sure of her success — even if slie isn't. 



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- 1926- 



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FRANCES FULLER 

"The Wonder" 
It has always been a wonder to us how Franres can excel in so many branches of 
athletics. We're wishinj; her the best of luck in all lines ! 

MILDRED GARRETT 

"The GoliJen Siitire'^] 
These dashinj; blondes! We wonder if Mildred's blonde hair will always cause as 
much discussion and disturbance as it does now. 

ERLINE GILCHRIST 

"The LUjht in the Cledrinf/" 
Out where Erline lives, it is said that she is like a iight, drawing many— er-- people to 
her. We'd like to say that they aren't the only ones who've been attracted, both by her grace, 
looks and friendly nature. 

MYRTLE GREEN 

"U'ho Cares?" 
A fitting name for one who has gone her very happy and carefree way through five years 
of toil. Her greatest ambition is to get thin. 

MARGARET LOVELACE GUNN 

"The White Sister" 
We envy Margaret becau.se of the tender solicitude she arouses in the hearts of the 
faculty by her lovely cheeks, uni)rofaned by rouge. 

IDA MAE HAGOOD 
"His Secretary" 
Ida Mae excels in athletics but that is not her only field of activities. Her efficienc}' and 
talent in commercial subjects show that lucky will be he who has her as "His Secretary." 



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- 1926- 



■■K)«<^o=5r^)C3<^o. 




WINIFRED HALLMAN 
■IIV Mmhrnx" 
With her naiij^hty smile and eiiily hiack hair, Wniiiie is a true type of what people 
call 'We Moderns." Winnie is also rather fast when she drives her "Ford down Broad Street. 

CATHERINE HARDMAN 

"Toward the Gun}" 
After five years of hard work, Catherine has reaehed lier ^oal — the coveted diploma. 
We hope she'll have the same success in reaching any other goals she may try to attain. 

MARY WILL HARVIN 

"The Mi/itterif (if Mari/." 
The mystery is liow can a girl look so angelic, and be — well, just like the rest of us. 
'Tis said she's won many hearts — perhaps by the charming way she tickles a "uke." 

VIOLETTE HEATH 

"Lavender and Old Lace" 
With her long hair and dennire ways, Violette brings thoughts of an old fashioned 
garden, a girl in hoop skirts. Hut whoever saw a girl of the sixties driving a "Ford" the 
way she does? 

ARVIS ADALE^IE HOLLEY 

"'i\cinkUni/ Toes" 
We can wish nothing better for .\rvis than that she may trip through life as blithely 
as she did through the measures of the "Wild Red Rose" — and win as many hearts in 
so doing! 

MARION LANGHORNE HOWARD 

"The l)weUin<i Place of LiphV 
Langhorne is unusually lucky, for her brilliance is nut confined merely to her 
gleaming locks, but extends to matbem.itics, history, and — well, just about everything else. 



-giO^JooSDco^ajo - -(j 



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~ 1926- 




OLA JANETTE HUTCHF.SOxX 

'•Little i[ii<.i Everiihody" 
Ola's popularity is attested l)y the fact that she held the high office of class president 
for two years. Her liright nature lias endeared her to many outside of Tubman's gates 
as well. 

FLORIDE CANTEY JOHNSON 
*'Thi' Shii'lfi of Silfiice^' 
Still waters run deep, and, though "Flo" never has much to say, when she does 
speak she knows what she's talking about, especially in history class. 

ELIZABETH BENTON JONES 
"Thy Broken Halo" 
It didn't take Elizabeth very long to break the halo that surrounded her when she 
first came to Tubman. Then she was a saint; now she's a chum to he admired, a friend to 
be loved. 

CATHERINE JOPI.IN 

"One Increasing Purpose" 
Catherine has "One Increasing Purpose," which she says is her only intdest in life 
and that is to succeed in her art work. But if you will notice, she seems mighty interested 
in all Richmond sports also. 

LILLIAN CLAIRE KELLY 

"To the Last Man" 
Like Caesar of old, Lillian comes, sees and conquers — hearts. Her only cause of 
worry is what she considers her excess avoirdupois, and that is rapidly disappearing. 

LOIS CLARE KELLY 
"The Joyous Trouble Maker" 
Lois mav be slow — witness her late arrival to classes — hut when she gets there 
there's certainly something doing. When she Hashes those charming dim|)les of hers — well, 
there's trouble, that's all! 



•°g>0<i5{°=S®c3<a' 




MQIDS QHD Q nQn] 

- 1926- 



°t@c=<^°°S^)«0°° 




ANNIE LAT'RIE I.ASS 

"Tlif Lonij Chance'' 

Annie Laurie will always rise al)ove the rest of us. After years of toil "The Long 
Chance" to get her "dip" has come. We'll wager she'll be having chances in — well, other 
matters — before long. 

JUANITA LUCKEY 
"The Lure of I rim" 
Who can resist Juanita, now that she'.s' felt the "Lure of Iron" — the curling iron? 
For that matter who could ever resist one as sweet-tetiipered and attractive as she. 

WILLIE MAE MILLS 
"The Road to UnderstttiHUiKj" 
Willie Mae is now far on "The Road to Understanding." She has gotten all the 
commerciMi subjects in her head and is about to get a "dip." We su.spect that she has 
other subjects there also — but it wouldn't do to talk 'out of school. 

VIRGINIA MOHKIS 
"The Ramblinij Kid from I'lncder River" 
Virginia is our champion priiiiper, but it seems to be worth the trouble in this case. 
She's never in a hurry, and her favorite exercise is riding — oli, no Mal)el ! not horse-back. 

MARTHA CAROLINE MURRAH 

"ilartie, the Vnconqtiered" 
Many hearts have been placed at her feet but as far as we know none have been 
accepted. She gives them all the same cheerful smile for which she is noted. 

KATHRVN EVELYN McDANIEL 
"Ma Cherie" 
Evelyn nuiy live right here in Augusta, but to us she'll always be the coy, bewitching 
"Fantine," who came straight from "Paree" and walked into the hearts of everyone. 



='g)o(lS°<'?®>o<a° 



HQIDS QHD-Q MQn 

~ 1926- 



•'K)c3<^°=^€)oG4" 




MARGARET McELMUHR AY 
"O/rf Roue and Silver" 
Margaret, being so dainty and loval>le, has always reiiiinds-d ns of a girl of long ago, 
the type that is rarely found these days. 

HfU.EN IRMA McEWEN 
"FInm liKj Youth" 
Helen is one of tlie shining lights of the class of '2(i. Slie is deeply interested in the 
study of history — especially in that which pertains to a modern Napoleon. 

ELIZABETH OTIS 

"The Tempeat" 
Elizabeth always gives one the impression of having just blown in or getting ready 
to breeze out again. One of these days she's going to make her fortune — or break her neck I 

JESSIE LEONORA OWENS 

•■The ReiJ Sipnar' 
Jessie's Titian beauty and enchanting lisp have attracted many of both sexes to her. 
Her locks also serve as a danger signal for some who would be too bold. 

HELEN MARGARET PERKINS 

•Heurt'n Desire" 
Just at present, Helen says her "Hearfs Desire" is the "dip" for which she has worked 
so hard, but later — well vou can never tell ! 

SUE SAXON PLUNKETT 

"The Wrecker" 
Though Sue hasn't wrecked any homes yet to our knowledge, she has shattered many 
hearts. Well, when one has brains and beauty, what else could be expected? 



"Kio^iooi^oOJ- 



HQiDS onD p non 

- 1926- 



■>t@C3^^=<.!^)C3(ao 




BLANCHE POWELL 
"So Bill" 
'Shorty" is just about "So Hifr" even in tliis day and age of hifrli heels. If 
"|)recious bundles come in small paokajris" Hlanclie is worth her weight in gold, for 
she's only pocket-edition size. 

MYRTLE VOXCILE ROGERS 
" 't'aiifflfti 'J'lin (ids" 
Voncile may get her tongue twisted at tinus, Init its only because she knows so 
much slie .just wants to tell it all at once! 

WILMINA ROWLAND 

"Tlif Mijultrii Mind" 
Wilmina gets the glass golf ball for answering Mi.ss Flisch's questions on the first 
trial. She's also gotten the love and respect of us all by her untiring and never ending 
efforts for the good of Tubman as "Madame President" of our class of '26. 

LUCLV SAMMONS 

"Frerkies" 

Lucia's good qualities are as numerous as the ' Freckles" on her face. Everyone will 
agree that she's a good s|)ort and all will join in wishing her every success in her chosen work 
as "somebody's stenog." 

ESTEI.I.E SAWILOWSKY 

•Thf Gii-Uettir" 
Whether it's lessons, athletics, or-iithcr things, we'll hand it to "Essie" — she usually 
gets what she goes after. Nuff sed ! 

- IIELINE SCHNEIDEU 
"Thf Cr olden Fiicf" 
Whenever any one is blue, all she neid do is to take one look at Heline, for her 
smile is a sure remedy. Perha])s this is one reason why she has attracted so many to her. 



••°^>«©5ooj@co<^" 



MQiDS QnD«Q npni 

- 1926- 




BESSIE ELISE SCOTT 

"The Oay Charmer 

If you ever need anybody to fool your blues away, just call on Bessie — that's her 

mission in life. She's our little (?) ray of sunshine. We fully expect to see her name 

in electric liphts some day (or rather night!), but however great her success may be we'll 

say she deserves it. 

EUI.A SEI.LEARS 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" 
When Evangelist Brown came to Tubman and delivered a speech on "Love and 
Biscuits," we suspect that Eula decided to practice what lie preached. Therefore we tell 
her to "Come Out of tlie Kitclicn. " 

RESSIE ETOLIA SENN 
"A sweet (jirl yradunte" 
Ressie fully deserves the title of "A Sweet Girl Graduate," botli for her sunny 
disposition and her willingness to work. Good luck to her ! 

HELEN LUCII.E SHELLHOUSE 
"The Innocent Abroad" 
We all think Lucile is mighty pretty — and just as sweet as she is good looking. 
She is quite a rarity in this day of the hard-boiled flapper, for she looks like an "Innocent 
Abroad." 

SARAH SHEPPARD 

"Enticement" 
Sarali's eyes could easi'.y l)e two of the reasons wliy men leave home. To look in 
them makes us wonder why we can't write poetry like Slieiley or Keats or — but take a look 
for yourself and you'll see what we mean. 

CAROLYN ASENATH SHIVERS 

"Our Mutual Friend" 
Peo])le who don't like Asenath are scarcer than Freshmen who respect Senior dignity. 
To all of us she's just ' Our Mutual Friend." 



°g)0®{oo«@CD<^o . . . 



NQiDs QHD p noni 

- 1926- 



''^)CO(^oo«^)C30o- . 




HAZEL ELIZABETH SIMONS 
"Po//i/anna" 
You who have read "Pollyanna," and who know Hazel can at once see the ap)>ro))riate- 
ness of this titU-. She's full of smiles for everyone — a regular 'Glad Girl." 

LOUISE SIMOWITZ 
■■The Price She PiiifV 
When anyone is as attractive as Louise, it's awfully hard to interest one's self in — 
lessons, hut now that she's come to the end of the trail, we think that Louise finds "The 
Price She Paid" not at all high for the value received. 

BESSIE SKINNER 
■■The Heiirhtu'' 
Our likeahle Bessie is now at the height of her high school career and is awaiting 
the wonderful night of June 10th when she hopes old dreams will he realized. 

AQUILLA SMITH 
■■Tlie Exceptional Emploifee" 
Quilla, alias Sadie SI orthand, certainly pounds a wicked tyjiewriter. Some day 
she'll he someone's "Exceptional Employee," and perhaps — hut we'll leave that to you! 

VIRGINIA ALICE SPANN 
"The Iron Woman" 
Alice is our "Iron Woman" — except in heart, which is true gold. She leads all 
competition in athletic events, hut that's no wonder since .she eats rock candy, stone cake, 
;ind hrick ice cream to keep in trim. 

HELEN STEED 

"./ Oirl in Eiftlil Ilvnilred" 
Helen has worked very hard and persistently during her five year term at Tubman, 
but she will receive the fniit of her lahors in the form of a diploma in June. Good 
luck to you Helen. 



■>^)0©{oo«®CO©J° • • • 



MQiDS QnD-p npni 

~ 1926- 



<>K)o®;°°^)c=><^o» 




THERESA STEINBERG 
^ "At the TTme Appointed" 
When Miss Page does (he Charleston J4«<1 Miss Flisch tlie tango then Theresa may 
get there "At the Time Appomted." 

MINNIE TANENBAUM 

"The A<ie of Innocence" 
Minnie's lool\ of innocence is entirely natural and genuine, but it does not extend 
to all subjects. When it comes to a knowledge of analytics and history and French, 
Minnie is right there. 

ALBERTA LORETTA THOMPSON 
"The Sentence of Silence" 
"The Sentence of Silence" certainly didn't fall on Alberta because Miss Comey calls 
her "The Talker." The old saying tliat man can read a woman like a book, but no man 
can shut her up like one, certainly applies to this case. 

MINNIE CHANDLER TOMMINS 
"Pemnnalitii Plug" 
"Bits" has what is known as personality and — well, "mmmm and a little bit more" 
which includes charm, sense, and good looks. There is a rumor that we are not the only 
ones who have discovered this fact. 

ELLEN LYON TRIGG 

".( Lad;/ of Lyons" 
Speaking of lions and other animals, we'll say this — Ellen never has gotten our Billy's 
goat! We hope that in the future Ellen will entangle as many hearts in the meshes of her 
blonde hair as she has done in the past. 

ROSA VIGNATI 
"Lightnin" 
Though Rosa may be a little slow she gets there just the same, which is the most 
important part after all. We've all come to love the little "Lightnin" of SeHiorU. 



<'^>«®*.oS@CO<^. . 



nPIDS QHD Q MQn^ 



■'^)c3<^<"'5ei)C3(aa 




EI.IZARETH ALBERTA WARNER 

"Keepini/ up zcith Lizzie" 
To keep up with Lizzie in her lizzie is — well, it just can't l)e done. The music lizzie 
makes may not be very pbasant, hut Lizzie's is of a iiuicli liigher order. Wc expect to hear 
great thinijs from our Sinlor nlprlitinjrale some (l;iy. 

KATE LOriSE WEIGLE 
"The Moilef 
We all know how stylisli and lovrly Kate is hut it was never so pronounced as when 
she appeared in the Fashion Sliow at White's. She's also noted for lier score of freshman 
crushes. 

GRAYSON WELLS 
"Her Oiim" 
Some people prefer ''.Jim" hut Gray.son has always placed "Gym" first in her activities. 
Ill all atliletic events she has always been present and has helped our class win its laurels there. 

LILLEY BAINBRIDGE WHITE 
'•The liig Parade" 
Lilley has had hard luck in her years at Tuluiian du" to illness but she is at last 
going to gain her reward by l)eing in 'The Big Parade" on the night of June tenth. 

EUNICE WHITLOCK 

"Independence" 
Eunice is known for lier steadiness of mind and independence of manner, We're sure 
she will make a success of life and we wish her all joy and liappiness. 

.JENNIE WILENSKV 
"Vnder Two Flaijx" 
Though .Jennie comes to us from far off Russia, she lias very soon adopted our Ameri- 
can ways. We just know she's going to he very successful in life ns she travels along her way 
"L'nder Two Flags." 



°g)0(^o=?®CO<^»o...(M 



~ 1926- 



'■^)«(^°°^)00<"' 




g>o(^o oJ@)CO<^o C3<^<.pS> C>( 



:^A 






•'g)o(©{°o?®o(a» • • -(M 






°t©C3^^°°S®«<a=° 




Fourth ) ear 
+ + 

Motto — "To be, not to scan; to do, not 
to dream." 

("lass Colors — Red and White 
Class Flower — Red Rose 



©ffirers 

+ + 

Blanche Kuhlke President 

Georgia Brawner Vice-Premdcut 

Sarah Whitney Secretnrij and Treasurer 






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°^)0©{ooS@)CO<^c.o. 



MQiDS QHD p npn 

- 1926- 




Adimis, Jcssaline Huth Al'.en, Elsie Ward Akennan, Elizabeth 

Anderson, Annie Siitlu-rland Armstrong, Mary Susan 

IJailie, Marijaret Beard, Aliee N'irginia Bell, Julia Carinichael 



°K)C3(^"> °SC)«=«^'> o©3 °P^(S( 



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» ^)o®?'' »i®»<a " • • • (M 



riQioa PHD p iipn 

- 1926- 




Bowden, Editli Iiuz Brawner, Georgia Haynie Chandler, Elizabeth Wilson 

Chew, Mary Harison Clarke, Frances 

Coffey, Christine Leroy Co))eland, Sara Taylor Davis, Lucilc Epps 



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• °g>a(^oo}@e)<a° ° • • 



HQiDS QnD Q mn 

- 1926- 



^""^iXCtt^o 




Dicks, Dorothy Dyclies, Elinor Myron Dye, Ruth Anne 

Ellis, Marianne MeKinne F.llison, Mary Warren 

Fender, Beulah May Fike, Mary Belle Fletcher, Mary Mercelia 









Jj^ g% )M^*^>"°i^>®<^°°^>==<a°''- 



• <>g>o®!;°o«@cxao • - •• , 



~ 1926- 



•^)cx;^oo^;g)cc<^o 




Garner, Evilee Garrett, Louise Getzen, Frances Mae 

Goldstein, Haeliael Gralilowsky, Ida Miriam 

Hamilton Elsie Hair, Riiliy Mildred Hammond, Katherine 



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iA 



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- 1926- 



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Hankinson, Stella Smythe Hildehr;mcU, Helen Marguerite Holden, Lydia May 

Hutto, Llewellyn I'liigenla Irvine, Mary Whittemore 

Jones, Evelyn Lillian Ki.hlke, Laura Blanche Lefkowitz, Jennie 






*A 



Xo>:g)c3.^>o(^o .^)o<^o 






°fg>ca:^°°^>»<a<" 




Markert, Florence Maxwell, Jeannctte Reliecca Miles, Mary Elizabeth 

Miller, Rul)y Leone Murphy, Mary Anna 

Oliver, Harriette Louise Pedersen, Dorothy Gladys Pilcher, Elizabeth 



' »^>o(^»=5^)ec*^oo(^«o^Vc|( 



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• »g)c>©{oot®co03- . 



^noiDS QHD Q nan 

~ 1926- 



°K)«(^oo^)C3(^o« 



wm^fmm 




Power, May Belle James, Meryl Redd, Lillian 

Hliodes, Sunie Dixon Uubens, Rose 

Satcher, Martha Kniiiialyiie Si-hautVle, lone Schneider, Sophie Lee 






SA 



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<'^)a©<°°?®cD<a° 



- 1926- 



■'t€)ca^°''5S)«@° 




Shinioff, Pearl Siiiitli, Ellen Carswell Smith, Ruth Palmer 

SiiiiMKins, Mary Kciris Shupson, Delia Wylie 

Speth, Dorothy Cecile Steed, Dene Hagan Stuart, Virginia Lorraine 






:sA 






a)o(©Sc.o^>=xa^ 



^. fcjmDSoriD Q mn 



o^)CC<^00^)0(^0. 




Tanenbaum, Hannah Minnie Thompson, Patricia Louise Trowbridge, I.iirile Morris 

Van Pelt, Lois Verdery, Mary Catherine 

Walters, Helen Elizabeth Weathersbee, Iva Wells, Lois Marie 



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f(^- 



M<§P>:^)c3=^>c<^o o^)co<g<, . . 



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MQIDS QHD Q nQm^ . 




West, tibulys WIimIcv, I.iihi Kliziihi-tli Whitney, Sarah Barry 

Williaiiisoii, N'iryiiiia Hawortli Wolfe, Frances Elizabeth 
Wood, Margaret Beverly Yearty, Annie Randall, Inez 






:*^ 



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- 1926- 



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O bain Q ar)n / "^i 





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OV. to ^e & Ndou? 



SENIOR FOUR SNAPSHOTS 



°^>==(^'^^)o<a'-o(^<'P^'(£3 



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"^icX^ooS^coOJ" 



nQiD& QHD p ncin 

~ 1926- 



°K)C3(^o oS^)C3<^o 



iFourtli ^rar #pntors 



FIRST TERM 
+ + 

Bargeron, Edith 

Bexsox, Mildred 

Davidson, Lii,a 

Doi.vix, Clifford 

EnwAUDs, Florrik 

Farhis, Nettie 

Hair, Ei,ma 

Harlev, Carolvn 

HixoN, Vera 

Hurt, Maude 

Jordan, Rutk 

KxiGHT, Ruth 

LiTTLETOx, Helen 

Pritchard, Mary Margaret 



'>^>co(^o o5^)coj:^o e><^<.p^(c>l 




5=>®o°^>s»(®8o - J®o<^. 



• «g)0®4oo«@fe3<a. . - 



HQIDS QHD Q nQHl 

- 1926- 



°^>C0®«o°^)C3<ao 



SE1|^ Sirgimtm^ of tl|0 iEttJi 

+ + 

Dear old Tubniaii! Our own Tuhiiian! 
Such fond mcniorics vou do send, 
^VlR■ll we re:ili/,e we're ajiproacliing 
Tlie hef^iiiniiijr of tlie end. 

Through tliese four long years of toiling. 
Years of sorrcws, joys, regret, 
We liave learned to love vou. Tubman, 
And your 1 elp ue'll ne'er forget. 



Dj 



T 



iihiiKin, vou 



have tauji'ht us 



Wh.at oui' learts anil minds should know; 
And the gladness you ha\e brought us, 
Will go with us when we go. 

'Ti.s so sad to think of parting. 
Nevermore your halls to roam, 
Nevermore attend vour classes 
Only tlioug'.its of you at home. 



De 



.1(1 Ti 



( )ui' ow n Tui) 



You're the school we love the best. 
You're the one whom we'll remember. 
When we"\ e forgotten a'l the rest. 

Foul' years ago, tl'.e day seemed long, 
AVIen we would say goodbye to you. 
Hut now that it is almost here. 
We think, how short those years, and few! 

We'll always have vou in our hearts. 
And in our minds the thought we'll fix. 
That you are loved by every girl 
In the class of llVifi! 

Leonk Mu.i.eh, '26 



■'^)C3(^» oJ@)CD<ao (SX^op: 




:o>:g)c3o^)cx^oo^)co<g. , . 







'n\n\ 'i| H"?7Nj'i|ii;i'iW)ii,)!iiiH'iiij') :' 




JUNIOR 



■>g)o©;o=«@co<a. 



MQIDS QHD Q HOn 

- 1926- 



•'^)a@!oo<^)C3<^o. 




»^)c3(^<>°5@>«<g''C>@}.p^W 



:4^ 






Jjunior (HiasB 



Class Colors — Blue and White Class Flower — Pansy 

Motto — "7'o tlw sfars through bolts and bars." 

(Officers 

Mary Ficki.ing President 

Ruth Knight Vice-President 

Nancy Clark Secretary and Treasurer 



Adams, Juanita 
Amos, lyavada 
Andronosky, Ida B. 
Anthony, Sarali 
Armstrong, Juanita 
Babbitt, Mary 
Bailey, Ossie 
Barrett, Anne 
Barchan, Irene 
Barton, Frances 
Beasley, Mary A. 
Bell, Sara 
Bignon, Hilda 
Bishop, Vivian 
Blanchard, Mary E. 
Bothwell, Marguerite 
Brady, I.ouise 
Brazelle Mildred 
Brickie, Wylena 
Brisendine, Elizabeth 
Britt, Ethel 
Bristow, Annie Mae 
Broadwater, Katie 
Broome, Verdine 
Buckley, Dorothy 
Busbia, Marion 
Byrd, Elizabeth 
Caldwell, Mary 
Capers, Clara 
Capers, Ernestine 
Cartledge, Mildred 
Cates, Mable 
Chancey, Thelma 
Clark, Nancy 
Cleckley, Connor 
Clemmons, Ruth 
Connor, Edith 
Cooper, Gertrude 
Crenshaw, Lucile 
Cromer, Clco 
Daly, Rosa 
Danforth, Thomasine 
Davis, Bennola 
Deas, Dorothy 
Decker, Dorothy 
Derrick, Harriet 



Dolvin, Anne 
Dolvin, Lily 
Dorn, Martha 
Durden, Mary W. 
Edwards, Julia 
Edwards, Martha 
Elliott, Irene 
Elliott, Margaret 
Fair, Catherine 
Fennell, Maurice 
Ferguson, Elizabeth 
Fickling, Louise 
Fickling, Mary 
Fields, Mary 
Flowers, Mary 
Fluker, Jane 
F"oster, Helen 
Fuller, Grace 
Gardner, Helen 
Gihnore, Gertrude 
Gardner, Mary C. 
Goss, Margaret 
Grear, Evelyn 
(ireiner, Doris 
Ciunn, Cecile 
Gunn, Ethel 
Gunter, Pearl 
Hagler, Evelyn 
Hallman, Ruth 
Hancock, Iris 
Hardaway, Louise 
Harrison, Marion 
Henderson, Parmie 
Hill, Susie 
Holibs, Wyoma 
Hoffman, Beatrice 
Hogan, Eva Mae 
Hogan, Irene 
Hogan, Vivian 
Hook, Ijillian 
Howard, Ruth 
Hughes, Emma 
Hulbert, Marie 
Humphrey, Charlie B 
James, Elma 
Jarrell, Gertrude 



Jarrett, Carolyn 
Johnson, Elizabeth 
Jones, Ann 
Jones, Catherine 
Jones, Edna 
Jones, Frances 
Joplin, Mary 
Kelly, Mary 
Kent, Lillian 
Kitchens,- Eleanor 
Knight, Edna 
I,amback, Dolly 
Lamkin, Nora 
Langley, Doris 
Layton, Marion 
Levy, Rose 
Lombard, Ruby 
Macky, Elizabeth 
Macmurphy, Adele 
Maddox, Thelma 
Martin, Mary 
Matheny, Katherine 
Masur, Mary 
Minnis, Margaret 
Mobley, Elizabeth 
Moring, Frankie 
Moring, Margaret 
Morris, Adrienne 
McClain, Clemens 
McClain, Lucille 
McClain, Phrontis 
McCollock, Evelyn 
McDaniel, Andrina 
McKenzie, I^eone 
McNutt, Helen 
Neal, Georgia 
North, Wallace 
OHara, Betty 
Oliver, Lottie 
Owens, Caroline 
Owens, Margaret 
Owens, Margaret 
Owens, Mary 
Paltrowitz, Anne 
Peters, Mary 
Phillips, Augustus 



Printup, Elizabeth 
Ridgely, Elizabeth 
Rheney, Louise 
Rhodes, Annie Kate 
Robinson, Laura 
Robinson, Mabel 
Rock, Esther 
Rogers, Edna 
Sanders, Elise 
Sanders, Eloise 
Sawilowsky, Birdie 
Scarboro, Elsie 
Seals, Grace 
Shivers, Mary 
Skinner, Margaret 
Smith, Ellen 
Smith, Hazel 
Spaulding, Mary 
Spires, Elsie 
Stanford, Roesel 
Steele, Ruby 
Steinek, Elsie 
Stockton, Merle 
Story, Ruth 
Sturman, Elizabeth 
Sullivan, Katherine 
Swearingen, Mary 
Thomas, Mabel 
Thomas, Norma 
Tommins, Louise 
Trader, Ruth 
Trowbridge, Nell 
Tunkle, Maydelle 
Van Pelt, Elizabeth 
Walker, Ruby 
Wall, Thelma 
Walton, Gussie 
Ward, Annie Kate 
Watkins, Carolyn 
Weathers, Annie Kate 
Whitaker, Mildred 
Winter, Caroline 
Wolfe, Adis 
Yates, Frieda 
Young, Margaret 



°g)0©4o=«@CO<a'' 



MQiDS QnD Q non 

~ 1926- 



"(©o^^" °SOoO° " 




JUNIOR SNAPSHOTS 



°^)C3(^» ■> J®C3(a » CX^ op:^W( 



:«^ 



i:*^©«og)co(^o o j@co(a. . . 




SOPHOMORE 



^A HQiDS QnD-Q f1Pn 




• °S€>c=(^o «5C>a<^° o(^°°^(g( 



A\ 



)MtgCo>^>0»g>C<^=oSg)co<g. . . 



o^)«(g!{ooS®C=«^» 




^oo^miC3(^0' 



^opl^omor^ Class 



Class Colors — Purple ami White Class Flowtr — White Rosebud 

Class Motto — ''^Live to learn and learn to live" 

Elizabeth liOCKiiART .-..President 

Frances Pierce Vice-President 

Idalene Kimbreli, Secretary and Treasurer 



Akernian, I, aura 
Allen, Matilda 
Anderson, Ruby 
Arnett, Gerzelda 
Averbuek, Anna 
Babbitt, Elva 
Bailev, Rachel 
Bailie, Sue W. 
Baird, Sarah 
Balk, Mary 
Baxlev. Martha 
Beall," Mary I. 
Boxx, Evelyn 
Brancy, Mary 
Brantley, Evelyn 
Brisendine, Ruth 
Brooks, Ruth 
Brown, Juanita 
Brown, Marion 
Brucker, Mabel 
Buck, Willie 
Byrd, Inez 
Caldwell, Margaret 
Cardon, Norma 
Carl, Mabel 
Carpenter, Grace 
Cartledffe, Mabelle 
Cbavous, Audrey 
Chavous, Ciladys 
Cluirehill, Natalie 
Clark, Katie 
Cobb, SliirUy 
Crawford, Blanehe 
Crickenberj2:er, Corinne 
Davidson, Linda 
Davis, Louise 
Dickson, Frankie 
Dike, Bessie 
Doolittle, Katie M. 



Durden, Virfrinia 
Dye, Mary 
Dye, Tbelnia 
Edmunds, Lillian 
Edwins, Myrtis 
Farmer, Hazel 
Fiske, Harriet 
Gay, Agnes 
Garrett, Harriet 
Gilchrist, Florence 
Gilson, Margaret 
Glisson, Estelle 
Goldberg, Lees 
Goldstein, Gussie 
Gracey, Sarah B. 
Grealisb, Margaret 
Cioss, Mattie 
Hallman, Margaret 
Hamilton, Vera 
Hancock, Ossie 
Harmon, Mary A. 
Harris, Marv 
Heath, Ruth 
Helmlv, ^'iola 
Hill, Mabel 
Holley, Mildred 
Holnian, Emily 
Holmes, Erline 
House, Norma 
Hull, Katharine 
Hundley, Margaret 
Jackson, Elenka 
Jackson, Waurega 
James, Ollie 
Jennings, Billie 
Johnson, Blanche 
Johnson, Corrie 
Jones, Betty 
Jones, Dorothy 



Kelly, Billy 
Kelly, Thco 
Kcsler, Huldah 
Kimbreli, Idalene 
Krcwson, Julia 
Laird, Marie 
Landrum, Alice 
Lansdell, Dorothy 
Lee, Virginia 
Levy, Lois 
Loekhart, Elizabeth 
Marsh, Mary 
Miller, Leslie 
Montgomery, Anna 
Montgomery, Daisy 
Mullin, Margaret 
Murphey, Martha 
McCormiek. Mildred 
McEwen, Cawtbon 
McKellar, Lula 
North, Neville 
Ogilvie, Isabel 
O'Neal, Dorothy 
Page, Marion 
Palmer, Velma 
Parks, Mary 
Partain, Derrelle 
Partridge, Beauford 
Pearson, Zella Mae 
Pierce, Frances 
Plunkett, Edna 
Pollard, Enuuie L. 
Pomerance, Naomi 
Reab, Anne 
Redd, Corothy 
Rennison, Alma 
Rennison, Nellie 
Reville, Eunice 
Rbinewalt, Kathleen 



Rhodes, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Mary 
Roesel, Evelyn 
Roesel, Ruth 
Rogers, Jean 
Rosenthal, Leah 
Rountree, Elizabeth 
Russell, Doretta 
Roy, Ethel 
Sanders, Julia 
Senn, Grace 
Smith, Helen 
Spradley, Effie 
Sprouse, Louise 
Stevens, Marie 
Stone, Mary 
Stoniker, Carrie 
Strickland, Hazel 
Sunuuerau, Alice 
Suunnerau, Nell 
Taylor, Helen 
Thomas, Nancy 
Tillman, Annie Sue 
'I'oole, Cathleen 
Towns, Evelyn 
Wagnon, Anna 
Walker, Irene 
Wallace, Anne 
Walton, Dell 
Walton, Sue 
Weathers, Mary 
Williams, Allene 
Williams, Alma 
White, Audrey 
Wolfe, Margaret 
Wolfe, Anna Elese 
Womack, Ruth 
Yearty, Sarah 



■• "g>C3(^ooJ^)0<^c,«^. 




:o:o:g>o«g)c)(^o c^)co(^o 



°g)«(^°°s®c3<ao 



npiD& QHD Q nnn 

- 1926- 



• • .^)Ca^oof^)C3<^oo 




SOPHOMORE SNAPSHOTS 



:«.\ 




f J ( ) o t ) r i ( 7 ( T 



FRESHMAN 



• °gte3©{o =J®co<a o . • ■ 



- 1926- 



°K)c*;^oo^)o(^o» 




• » g)c3(^ " *@co<a » o(^ • °J^iC>( 



SA 



itp=>;^)a»®ia<^o . j^)c3<^. 



Sir^Bi^man (Elasa 



Abnett, Mary 
Alston, Margaret 
Anderson, Martha 
Anpelakos, Lucile 
Ashniore, Elizabeth 
Bailie, Elizabeth 
Baird, Edna 
Ballentine, Anna 
Ballentine, Ida Lee 
Barrett, Verdell 
Batenian, Lillian 
Bates, Cleo 
Beane, Donza 
Beaver, Tessie 
Bell, Margaret 
Blacknian, Juanita 
Booze, Pauline 
Brenner, Lucia 
Brennan, Helen 
Broome, Blanche 
Bryant, Margaret 
Bryant, Martha B. 
Buckley, Lenora 
Burkhalter, Margaret 
Butler, Helen 
Cain, Claddie 
Carrigan, Helen 
Carroll, Elizabeth 
Carroll, Evelyn 
Chavous, Lona 
Cheek, Julia 
Cheeks, Owanee 
Clarv, Evelvn 
ColeJ Ella 
Connell, Frances 
Connell, Katherine 
Conner, Wilnia 
Cook, Callie 
Cowan, Barbara 
Cox, Bernice 
Crozier, Adaline 
(riMiijiton, Mildred 
Daly, Pauline 
Daniel, Helen 
Davidson, Katherine 
Davis, Almeda 
Davis, Marion 
Delph, Dorothy 
Dennis, Mary 
Dennis, Sue 
Dickinson, Alma 
rixon, Sallie M. 
Dorrill, Melba 
Duhig, Evelvn 
Dunbar, Betty 
Durst, Porothv 
Dye, Ethel 
Edmonds, Margaret 
Edwards, Juanita 
Ellis, Katlileen 
Emigli, Ellen 
Evans, Katie 
Ford. Louise 



Ford, Rosa Lee 
Forney, Frances 
Fulcher, Virginia 
(jarvin, Gwendolyn 
(iermon, Jessie 
tjoldman, Mildred 
Goodwin, Anna 
Cioodson, Kathryn 
("lordon. Elizabeth 
(ireen, Lucile 
Cireneker, Pickens 
CJreiner, Elizabetii 
Cirimaud, Mattie Loi 
(irimes, Dorotiiy 
(irossnian, I.illie 
Hair, Agnes 
Hamilton, Eva 
Harley, Hazel 
Hardy, Margaret 
Hardy, Myrtis 
Harris, Dorothy 
Harris, Evelvn 
Heath, Dottie 
Heath, Lucile 
Henslev, Mary 
Hill, Ruth 
Holl, Ethel 
Hoffman, Ethel 
Holley, Naomi 
Holmes, Cora Mae 
Holmes, Ruth 
Hood, Mary Edna 
Howard, Julia 
Howard, Viola 
Hunter, Lalla 
James, Anita 
Jarrett, Mildred 
.lefFcoat, Thelma 
Jenkins, Inez 
.Jennings, Xathalene 
.Ternigan, Grace 
.Johnson, Annie 
•Johnson, Fannie 
.Jolmson, Jessie 
Jones, Annie Mae 
Jones, Frances 
.Jones, Jean 
.Jue, Margaret 
Keenan, Nan 
Kelley, Lillian 
Kiser, Edna 
Kitcliens, Orita 
Knight, Lillian 
Kuehnel, Pauline 
Lamb, Lucille 
Lamback, Elizal)eth 
Lee, Catherine 
Legwen, Mary A. 
Lester, Emma 
Lewis, Mary 
Logue, Edna 
Lombard, Marvella 
Lowery, Birdie Lee 
Luckey, Edith 



MacDaniel, Annie R. 
McAlhaney, Catherine 
McCall, Annie Lou 
McCarty, Lydia 
McCoy, Lois 
McCoy, Lyda Mae 
McCrary, .Toe 
McKinney, Margaret 
McNaughton, Zoe A. 
Mackv, Helen 
Maddox, Mildred 
Marsliall, .Jacqueline 
Melton, Bessie 
Melton, Eula 
Mersl.on, Ardene 
Meyers, Lucille 
Mills, Mary 
Milton, Catherine 
Mitchell, Alberta 
Mixon, Dorothy 
Moore, Ethel 
Morris, Almeda 
Morris, Julia 
Morris, Martha 
Move, Margaret 
Mulcay, Elizabeth 
Mulligan, Lena 
Murphy, CJenevieve 
Murphy, Louise 
Murphy, Ruth 
Neal, Mary 
Nelson, Ida Lee 
Newman, Helen 
O'Neal, Hvlon 
Pate, Evelyn 
Peacock, Mary 
Pearson, Dorothy 
Pearson, Myrtis 
Phelps, Frances 
Pierce, Dorothy 
Pitts, Elizabeth 
Plunkett, Isabel 
Plunkett, Josephine 
Poole. .Janie Belle 
Poston, Maggie 
Prescott, Esther 
Raley, Agnes 
Randall, Winton 
Rearden, Malile 
Reeves, Janie 
Reeves, Sybel 
Reid, Frances 
Rhoades, Marion 
Rhodes, Annie Mae 
Rhodes, Wynona 
Richardson, Ann E. 
Richardson, Mary C. 
Richardson, .lane 
Rickerson, Ophelia 
Rockwell, Margaret 
Roessler, Catherine 
Rigsby, Geneva 
Roseman, Sadie 
Ross, Rosa Lee 



Rowe, Myrtis 
Rush, Wilhemina 
Sack, ^'irginia 
Satcher, Evelyn 
Scarboro, Thelma 
Scattergood, Ora 
S^'hafFer, Marjorie 
S?nn, Mildred 
Schley, Helen 
Shi[)p, Noelle 
Southall, Mary 
Stockton, Dorothy 
Stone, Corinne 
Story, Agnes 
Story, Dorothy 
Story, Mary 
Story, t)live 
Suther. Lucille 
Taft, Eliza 
Taylor, Frances 
Templeton, Margaret 
Thomas, \'irginia 
Tl omas, Myra 
Tliompson, Myrtle 
Todd. .Jewett 
Toiiiinins, Betty 
Traylor, .Sarah 
Trowbridge, Nannie 
Twiggs, Marion 
L'hl, Mary Vivian 
Verdery, Gertrude 
Vorhauer, Elizabeth 
Wagnon, Estelle 
Walker, Martha 
Walker, Irene 
Walker, Mvrtle 
Wall, Evelvn 
Wall, Viola 
Ware, Fanily 
Watkins, Mary 
Wcatherhorn, May 
Weatliers, Irene 
Week, Marion 
Weeks, Ruth 
Weinstein, Esther 
Wertz, F21iza 
West, Emily 
Whaley, Inez 
Wiggins, Frances 
Wiley, Mable 
Wilkerson, Emily 
Williams, Elvora 
Williams, Elizabeth 
\\illiams, Genevieve 
Winliurne, Nancy 
Winter, Mozelle 
Wise, Louise 
Wittimer, Lena 
Wolfe, Dorris 
Wright, Marjorie 
Young, Roberta 
Youngblood, Lillie 
Zealy, Sarah 



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FRESHMAN SNAPSHOTS 






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HOXOU LEAC;t'E COUNCIL 

Wii.jiiN A Hii\vi.AXT> President 

t'ATiiKBiNE Verdkry Serreliirii 

Hki.kn Dicks Senior 5 Representative 

Ossii: Haii.ey Senior I Representative 

Ei.izAiiKTu Bhisendine Junior Representative 

Georgia Neal Suphitiiiore Representative 

Mrs. Lyeth Faculty Advisor 



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~ 1926- 



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AH}ietit Council 



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Virginia Fleming - President 

EsTELLE Sawilowsky Vice-Pvesident 

Jii-iA Bei,l Treasurer 

Nancy Clark.. Secret (try 

Alice Spann Senior 5 lieprcsciitative 

Margtterite HiLDEHRANDT Soiior 4 Ucprescntutive 

Eliza liETH Buiskxdixe J iniior Representative 

Harriet Garrett Sophomore Representative 

Dorothy Pierce Freshman Representative 

Miss Eliza heth Sir ay horn Fticiilf 1/ Advisor 

Miss Grace Berry Phi/suul Director 

Miss Celeste Wickliffe Physical Director 

Mr. T. H. Garrett Ex-Officio Member 



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Elizabeth Warner President 

Evelyn McDaniel Secretary 

Kate Louise Weigle Treasurer 

Nancy Clark ] 

> Librnrians 

Lois Kelly j 



Anthony, Sara 
Armstronfr, Juanita 
Aveibuck, Anna 
Bailey, Ossie 
Baird, Edna 
Balk, Mary 
Barchan, Irene 
Browne, Marian 
Bush, Margaret 
Carlyon, Elizabeth 
Cooper, Gertrude 
Dorrill, Melba 
Edwards, Florrie 
Farris, Nettie 
Ford, I>ouise 
Fulcher, Eioise 
Fuller, Grace 
Gilniore, Gertrude 
Gunn. Marparet 
Goodwin, Anna 
Goss, Mattie 
Grear, Evelyn 
Greiner, Elizabeth 
Hill, Mabel 
Hixson, Vera 
Hulbert, Marie 
Holnian, Emily 
James, Meryl 
.Jernipan, Grace 
Jones, Ann 
Jones, Dorothy 
Jones, Edna 
.Tones, Elizabeth 
Kelly, Mary 
Laniback, Ollie 



I.efkowitz, Jennie 
Luckey, Juanita 
McKenzie, Leona 
McNaughton, Zoe Audrey 
McN'utt, Helen 
Montgomery, Anna 
Murphey, Martha, 
Murrah, Martha 
Neal, Georgia 
Page, Marion 
Pearson, Zella Mae 
Perkins, Helen 
Pierce, Frances 
Roesel, Ruth 
Roessler, Catherine 
Rosenthal, Leah 
Seals, Grace 
Shivers, Asenath 
Shivers, Mary 
Stanford, Roesel 
Steele, Ruby 
Stone, Corinne 
Thomas, Mable 
'I'hompson, Alberta 
Traylor, Sarah 
Twiggs, Marian 
Walters, Helen 
Weathers, Anna Kate 
Wells, Marie 
M'hite, Lilley 
Whitney, Sarah 
Wolfe, Helen 
Yearty, Sarah 
^'oung, Margaret 
/.ealv Sarah 



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i/erc Zips the Annual Staff. Killfd hi/ Hard Work. May 8, 192G. 



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~ 1926 ~- 



Annual ^tafi 1925-26 

FIFTH YEAR SENIOR EDITORS 

WiLMixA Rowland Editor-in-Chief 

Minnie Tommins Business Manager 

Mary Fiske Literary Editor 

Ruby Printup Art Editor 

EsTELLE Sawilowsky Athletic Editor 

Helen Dicks Picture Editor 

FOURTH YEAR SENIOR ASSISTANTS 

Marianne Ellis ....Editor-in-Chief 

Sarah Whitney... ..Business Manager 

Virginia Stuart Literary Editor 

Frances Fuller Art Editor 

Sophie Lee Schneider A thletic Editor 

liOis Van Pelt Picture Editor 

JUNIOR ASSISTANTS 

Laura Robinson Editor-in-Chief 

Nancy Clark Business Manager 

Margaret Minnis Literary Editor 

Catherine Fair Art Editor 

Mary Emma Blanchard Athletic Editor 

Thelma W^all - Picture Editor 

Mildred A. Ridgely Faculty Advisor 




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iJnstrxtui^ntal Club 

Bell, Julia Violin 

BoTHWELL, Marguerite Violin 

EuRCH, EvELvx Violin 

Heath, Violette Violin 

Irvine, Mary Violin 

Jones, Ann Violin 

Johnston, Elizabeth Piano 

Clark, Nancy Mandolin 

I.EFKowiTz, Jennie Mandolin 

Smith, Helen ...Mandolin 

FiSKE, Mary' Ukelele 

Harvin, Mary Ukelele 

Jernigan, Grace Ukelele 

Jones, Dorothy ....Ukelele 

Kelly, Mary Ukelele 

Miles, Mary Ukelele 

Rosenthal, Leah ...Ukelele 

ScHAUFELE, loNE - Ukelcle 

Scott, Bessie Ukelele 

Seals, Grace Ukelele 

Stockton, Merle Ukelele 

Trowbrdge, LrciLE Ukelele 

Ellis, Marianne Guitar 



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Art ^aveh? 



Wlicn strolliiiff sclioolward every flay, 
Loni^inir for tlie end of May, 
And tliinkinir tliat tlie world is ^ray, — 
Art Bored P 

Wlicn all announcements seem to be, 
"Hockey practice at lialf-])ast three," 
And "Girls bo (juiet" is tlie i)Iea, — 
Art Bored? 

When you hurry through tiie hall, 
Knocked ai-ound like a basket-ball, 
Wishing to be divinely tall, — 
Art Bored? 

When you write another test. 
And tr_v to do your level best, 
Despite these everlasting pests, — 
Art Bored? 

When the recess bell has rung. 
And your nerves are all unstrung. 
You'd like to see the teachers "hung", — 
Art Bored? 

Now when you've finished school at last, 
Holding your diploma tight and fast. 
Viewing this good, old world aghast, — 
Art Bored? 

Lillian Kelly '26 



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^^ninr Class Say 

+ + 

VOYAGE OF THE GOOD SHIP !26 

0\ SErTEMHER 19, 1!)21, the Good Sliip set sail for a five-year 
voyage across tlie Higli School Sea to tlic harbor of Graduation. 
One hundred and seventy-two of us with oui' suj)erior officers and our 
captain, T. Harrv (iai lett, made u|) the criw.. It was our first voyage in so 
large a sliip. "^J'he larger and oldei' vessels in tiie harbor wiiich were scheduled 
to go ])art of tile wav with us told us in hushed voices of tile terrible ins])ections 
which wi' would havi' to pass, or asked >is in sai'castic \()ices if we hadn't better 
get a tug to tow us in. Despite thiir scoffing, we bra\elv weighed anchor. 
AVe were just getting accustomed to the workings of our shi]> and the orders 
of our officers when oui' first inspection came. We knew that it would come, 
but it was worse than we had feared. There was one week of this ordeal before 
we again went back to work — this time with longer faces and more determined 
minds. Soon after this, we noticed one dav, to the star-boaril, another vessel 
weighing anchor. \\'liat could it be.'' It was a whole seven nionths before 
another ship was due to sail. On asking our cajitain, we learned that it was 
tiic first time any slii}) had set sail at this time of the year, but that the crew, 
being braver and wiser than others, had ])ut all steam ahead on their last 
cruise and arriveil on the slioies of the High School Sea four months before 
they \vere expected. Being impatient, they had embarked at once. 

As we had much to learn, we were not allowed to enter athletics wliicii 
Would have madi' the xovage seem much shortei'. It was, perhaps, out of con- 
.sideratioh for us that our cajitain conti-ivi'd to have shown on board the en- 
tertaining pictui'i' "I'l'unella." This was the first and last time such a thing 
was done, our ca])tain realizing tln' romantic effect it had upon our crew. We 
did, however, learn one \aluable lesson from this picture. The lesson was, 
"Any thing is acceptable that takes u]) two |)eriods." Second insjH'ction came 
upon us quite as unaware as had the first, but as a result we were obliged to 
sail into dry dock in the middle of .June for three months' repairs. 

Hv the middle of September we were again I'eadv to put to sea. \Ve kiu'w 
now what kind of weather we were likely to encounter and had trimmed our 
sails for the voyage. We were now experienced enough to enter athletics and 
did so with such fervor that our team, while nut lirilliantly successful 
the first year, showed what we had in us and foretold the future successes we 
were to win. To bi'eak the monotony of that second la]) of our voyage we 
stopped at Pleasure Isles and taking "mess" went to the inland lake. Lake 
Auuiond. Every one hated to leave, but we had to make harbor on schedule 
time. After nine months' hard sailing, we again docked old '2(5 and took shore 
leave for three nionths. 

There was much excitement when the '2(5 sli|)|)ed into the water at the 
beginning of the fourth lap of her voyage. All the previous log-books in the 



chart room showed tliat tlie crew of tlie '26 was in for much hard work and 
iiiaiiy good times. Tlie first of tiiese excitements was in the ordering of the chiss 
rings and pins. So successful was the committee in selecting this design that 
they decided it should be adopted as tlie official emblem of all the ships which 
were to follow us. We also proved our skill in athletics this year by sailing 
off with all the honors in basket-ball and also in nearly all the other events. 
Not content with this, the crew decided to take uj) dramatics. "The Bells of 
Beaujolais" was the oj>eretta which we selected. Our success was as complete 
as we could have wished, both financially and artistically. We were kindly- and 
skillfully trained by our superior officers. The costumes and songs were 
beautiful, the speaking parts both romantic anil witty, the solo and group 
dances graceful. The purpose of the ])lay was to raise money for the Junior- 
Senior banquet. The Seniors got leave from the '2.5 and came aboard the '26 as 
guests of her crew. The bancjuet, like every thing else we had attemj)ted, was a 
great success. It was at this banquet that we officially bade the crew of the '25 a 
final farewell, half in envy, half in sorrow, for the '26 was already half-speed 
ahead in preparation for docking at her final harbor. The class picnic was the 
final event of interest in our Junior year. We stopped at Good Times Isle and on 
the beach at Tidwell's we spread our mess. "All nautical pride was laid aside" 
while we went in swimming, talked, sang and had a generally good time. And 
&o, with final inspection, the most eventful year of our good ship closed, and 
the '26 was again laid up for repairs. 

By the middle of September everything was ship-shaj)e, and we set sail 
on the last lap of our long and eventful voyage. The sea was rougher and the 
going worse than in any of our previous voyages, but we worked harder, and 
brought the '26 to mid-year inspection with as much success as our now some- 
what depleted crew could have hoped for. And now our long voyage is nearly 
over, and we are bringing the '26, covered with the laurels we have won, into 
harbor, and what's more we are bringing her in under her own steam. Our 
crew, as I have said, is some-what de])leted. Some, finding the High School 
Sea too calm, have cut loose their life-boats and set sail on the Sea of matri- 
mony. Others have not passed inspection and have been forced to become 
members of the crew of the vessel just astern. Some, in anticipation of in- 
spection, have jumped over board and swum to parts unknown. But the 
rest of us are now fl3'ing our top gallants and throwing hurried glances at 
charts, battering down our hatches, and preparing for the final inspection. 
Not all the glances are thrown at charts, however ; some of them are at 
catalogues with suggestion for full dress luiiform. 

It is fitting, as we make our ])reparations for dropjiing anchor at the 
harbor of Graduation, that we should fire a salute for each of our kind supe- 
rior officers, and particularlv for our captain who has helped us to steer our 
good shij) so successfully into ])ort, and we wish those who come after us the 
successful voyage which we have enjoyed. 

Floride Johnson '26 



»^)o©{°°?®o<a° 



nOlDS QHD Q fiQn 

~ 1926- 



Slast win anh Etsiament 

+ + 

^Y^E, THE FIFTH-YEAR Senior Class of Tubman Higli School, City 
^ 1 ^ of Augusta, County of Rieinnond, State of Georgia, Country of the 
V^ ^ United States, Continent of North America, being of our usual un- 
sound and unbalanced mind and nearing the completion of our happy sojourn 
at Tubman, do hereby make this our "Last Will and Testament." 

ITEM I. To Mr. Garrett, the dearest and most beloved friend of our 
class, we give our deepest thanks and love for his ever-ready help in all our 
undertakings and accomplishments. 

ITEM II. To Miss Dora is bequeatlied "How to be Punctual and 
Quiet," written by Senior B, to be used by her in the training of coming 
generations. 

ITEM III. To Miss Flisch, Mary Fiske bequeaths her ukelele togetlier 
with "How to Play a Ukelele in Two Weeks," hoping that Miss Fliscii will 
be the most valued member of the Instrumental Club. 

ITEM IV. To Miss Green is left tlie ])eanut stand, corner of Broad 
and Mcintosh Sts., in hopes that siie may cultivate a tliriving peanut farm on 
which to retire. 

ITEM V. To Miss Woods is bequeatlied one box of "Sweetly Yours," 
so characteristic of the recipient. 

ITEM VI. To Miss Comey are five bottles of Tanlac so that she 
may acquire some "pep." 

ITEM VII. To Miss Page are lefr three keys in liojyes tliat one will fit 
her garage door. 

ITEM VIII. ]\Iinnie Tomniiiis leaves to Mary Ir\ine her (juiet, lovable, 
manner. 

ITEM IX. Virginia Fleming leaves to Mary Chew her latest essay, 
"How to Get Fat During Exams" (written from ex})erience). 

ITEM X. Clemniie Downing leaves to Elizabeth Chandler twelve bars 
of Hershey's chocolate, hoping that Elizabetii may never want for her favorite 
dish. 

ITEM XI. Floride Johnson leaves to Elton McCormick iier bashful 
blushes — such an alluring asset. 

ITEM XII. Juanita Luckey becjueatlis to Margaret Wood lier sweet 
disposition. 



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ITEM XIII. WiluiiiKi Rowliuul leaves to Blanclic Kulilku a book on 
I'ai-liamentary Law. 

ITEM XIV. Lillian Kelly leaves to Mary Fletcher one Boyish Bob. 

ITEM XV. Cathei-iiie Jo))lin lea\e.s to Florence Markert five of her 
masterpieces, hoping that they will aid Florence in her contributions to the 
Louvre. 

ITEM X\'I. Theresa Steinberg leaves to Caroline Harley one rocking 
chair in Study II, to be used by her between the hours of two-ten and three. 

ITEM XVII. To Billie Garrett, Elizabeth Jones leaves one box of 
Snow Flakes. 

ITEM XVIII. Elizabeth Warner leaves to Dorothy Speth one Jantzcn 
bathing suit. 

ITEM XIX. Ola Hutcheson bequeaths to Virginia Williamson the 
secret of pretty eyes. 

ITEM XX. Mildred Garrett and Sue Phinkett leave to Catherine 
Verdery and Eugenia Hutto each one bottle of Orange-Crush. 

ITEM XXI. To Sarah Whitney, Langhorne Howard bequeaths her 
reasoning powers. 

ITEM XXII. Sarah Shep])ard leaves to Marguerite Hildebrandt one 
motto, "Don't shout until ye see the need of it." 

ITEM XXIII. Alice S|)ann leaves to Ruth Knight her sweater — if 
Ruth can find it under the letters and numerals. 

ITEM XXIV. Pollen Trigg leaves to Virginia Stuart voluminous 
letters of introduction to Mrs. Deas. 

ITEM XXV. Bessie Scott bequeaths to Stella Hankinson and Sarah 
Co|)eland one ukelele, one moonlight night, plus. 

ITEM XXVI. The Latin section leaves to Frances Getzcn their ability 
to translate Latin at sight. 

ITEM XXVII. The Biology class leaves to Marianne Ellis their un- 
equaled and unsurpassed talent for bisecting and coni])rehending the digestive 
system of a frog. 

Drawn up and recorded in this year of our Lord, nineteen hundred 
and twenty-six. 

EvELYx McDaniel, Testator. 
Witness : 

Anonymous 



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OWING to tlif unusual brilliance and prominence of the 1926 class of Tulmian 
Hiph School, a special edition of WHO'S WHO has been issued, edited by 
(Jeorpia Brawner, I.aura Fair, Catherine Joplin and Sue Saxon Phinkett. 
AKMSTROXC;. MARY,— noted Zeigfield beauty and past master of the 
Charleston, has introduced the "Woozy Wiggle" into tlie social world. It is 
said by dancing authorities that it will surpass the Charleston in popularity. 

ARNOLD, EMMA,— and OWENS, JESSIE,— are making a hit in the beauty circle 
ol New York with their ])opular lieauty slio]). It is equipped with electric powder-puff.s 
as they have a fellow feeling for the school girl of today. Arm work is so tiring! 

"AUERBACH, JULIETTE,— who was a well-known Tubman beauty, has accepted 
the position as head of the Latin dejiartment at the University of Alabama. 

BANNESTER, RUBY, — Recent .scientists have said that the improvement in health 
conditions all over the world is due to the fact that Miss Bannester has taken up the 
noble profession of nursing. 

BATTEN, MARIAN, — is now the Dean of Osborne's Business College and has made 
this college the leading one in Augusta, Ihr Gnnffn Citif of the South. 

BLAND, FRANCES, — has made a startling discovery in the anatomy of a frog. 
While dissecting said animal the other day she found the telospordia-haemospordia, which 
organ is a great addition to the zoological world. 

BURCH, EVELYN,— has just defeated Helen Wills in the tennis tournament at 
Nice, France. She startled the world but not her former school mates who had often seen 
"dashing Evelyn" on the courts at Tubman. 

BURNETTE, RUTH,— has forged ahead in politics, thanks to her colleague, Miss 
Flisch, and is now mayoress of Grovetown. 

BUSH, MARGArET; CANNON, MYRTICE,— well known realtors of Augusta, 
have in every way put Miami in the shade. It is said they have sold everything in Augusta 
except the fish in the Savannah River. 

CHEW, MARY, — an ardent admirer of Atlanta and a well-known society woman, 
is endeavoring to |)ut Atlanta back on the map with little success. Augusta reigns supreme. 

CARLYON, ELIZABFjTH, — who in former days was very much in favor of a career, 
has not only married but has made her jialatial mansion into a home for orphan children 
where they are trained for careers. 

CORBITT, MEI.VIS and MURRAH, MARTHA and JOHNSON, FLORIDE,— 
have surprised their numerous friends by going to Africa as missionaries. Melvis is used 
as an example of jiatienee while Martha teaches them how to recite "spooky" pieces. 
Floride enjoys giving the little black folk castor oil as she is official doctor. 

CULPEPPER, MARC;ARET,— has taken Miss Null's place as a teacher of Spanish 
at Tubman. Authorities say that a Spaniard, coming to this country and conversing with 
Miss Culpepper, innnediately desires to return and hear the language correctly spoken. 

CULPEPPER, MERYL, — who, as we all know married a country doctor, is said to 
be an ideal doctor's wife in every way, even to accompanying him on his daily rounds ir^ the 
old ox-cart. But what is an ox-cart when love is present? 

CURRIE, MARtlARET and HOWARD, LANGHORNE,— have shocked and dis- 
illusioned their schoolmates by their breath-taking, dare-devil stunts such as scaling the 
walls of Tubman and standing on their heads on the flag-pole. 

D'ANTIGNAC, MARTHE, — who has been abroad for several years has introduced 
a new bob, in Paris known as the "Riders' Rest." This bob it is said gives the wearer 
"blessed assurance" on the wildest escapade. 

DAVIDSON, JEAN,-a noted photographer has put all the photographers in Augusta 
out of the business. She, with her able assistant, LOUISE SIMOWITZ, makes all the 
Annual pictures for Tubman each year. 

DAVIS, I.l'CILE; TROWBRIDGE, LUCH.E; SHIMOFF, PEARL and MILLER, 
LEONE, — have jierfected a new way by which best friends may remain together always. 




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DICKS, DOKOTHY and HELEN — have heooinc wcirUl famous since publishing their 
hook on "How to he Friends thoufrli Sisters," It is heinjr liiiujrht l)y sisters every wliere. 

DOWN'INC, t'l.EMMIE,— wlio is now I.ady Castktoii-.MoIjran, has eaptivated staid 
Enfflaiul l)y lier winsome Soutliern cliarm. Her Southern hosi)itality is known througrli tlie 
lengtli and l)readth of Enghind. 

DYKES, LOI.LIE MAK,— lias made lier dehut at the Metropolitan Djiera House witli 
her startling interpretation of the well-known master))iece, "Does Sitearniint Lose Its Flavor 
On The Bed-Post Over-Night?" It is said that she received a larger ovation at her debut 
than Marion Talley. 

ELLISON, "MARY and RHODES, SLNIE,— have excavated the tomb of King 
Halitosis and Queen Halitosia of Listerinca. This is the most wonderful discovery since that 
of King Tut. It has been advertised in such an "insidious" way, however, that most people 
haven't noticed it. 

FENNELL, HELEN and OTIS, ELIZABETH,— have invented a very effective way 
of reducing. The results are so marvelous that thev have completelv put Wallace's Daily 
Dozen out of business. LUCIA SIMMONS, SARAH SHEPPARD and QUILLA SMITH 
are giving them a rushing business by acting as living proof of the effectiveness of the 
system. 

FISKE, MARY, — has disappointed all of her friends by marrying a movie actor. She, 
herself, has become quite a star (not one of the heavenly kind) featuring in "The Lost Bride." 

FLEMING, VIRGINIA, — has become Dean of Cambridge College in England and has 
certainlv excelled all previous Deans. She received her early training as a debater at Tulmian. 

F"ULCHER, ELOISE and THOMPSON, ALBERT .\,— have opened a school for the 
dumb. At last thev are ha])i)v because they can talk forever without being interrupted. 
ELIZABETH WARNER and GRAYSON WELLS are their able assistant.s. 

PERKINS, HELEN, — has opened a shop on Fifth Avenue known as the Stylish 
Stout Shopi)e. MYRTLE GREEN and THERESA STEINBERG are her most popular 
models. All three think that being stout is no drawback to being stylish, 

GARRETT, MILDRED, — has surprised not only her family but also her school-friends 
by accepting two responsible positions at Tuliman. She has taken Miss Hains" place as a 
Latin instructor, and Miss Green's place as Math, teacher. Former friends of Mildred will 
remember her brilliancy in both subjects. 

GILCHRIST, ERLINE, has accepted the position as chief model for Hole-Proof 
Hosiery. A former Tubnuin friend of hers reconnnended her for this position, 

GUNN, MARGARET,— is now head of the Art Department at Tubman. She is 
rivaling Miss Fowler as to the length of her dresses. 

HAGOOD, IDA MAE, — is Miss Tubb's latest assistant, and is doing excellent work. 
We know that she accepted the position to be near her beloved former teacher. 

HALLMAN, WINIFRED and .lAMES, MERYL,— have perfected a new tonic on how 
to take the curl out of wavv hair. MAYBELLE POWER, VIRGINIA MORRIS, HELINE 
SCHNEIDER, VONCILE ROGERS and MINNIE TANENBAUM have evidently been 
told that they had curly hair and it isn't the style, because they're giving the tonic a wild rush. 

HEA'i'H, VIOLETTE,— who performs" on the violin, together with BESSIE SCOTT 
with her "uke," EVELYN McDANIEL on the piano and ELIZABETH JONES to turn 
the pages for her, LILLF^Y WHITE with her harmonica and INEZ RANDALL and 
FRANCES WOLFE with combs, compose the "Town's Howling Success," an orchestra that 
is widely known for its resemblance to cats on the back fence at mid-night. 

HLITCHESON, OLA, — who has always had a fondness for distinguished names such 
as Smith, for instance, has founded a home known as the "Smith Senseless School," 

HAIR, RUBY and SHELLHOUSE, LUCILE,— are breaking all racing records at 
Pasadena, California, with the little red car that all Tubnuin girls will recognize. MISS HAIR 
is the driver while MISS SHELLHOUSE acts as mechanician, 

H.\MII.T()N, ELSIE and McEWEN, HELEN,— are the famous chajierons at all 
social affairs given at the L'niversity of Georgia. They were unanimously chosen because 
of the ])atriotic colors of their hair. 

HARDMAN, CATHERINE, — Those who have racked their brains to discover who 
Beatrice Fairfax is will be startled to learn she was in our midst /dways and none other than 
gentle CATHERINE herself. 



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~ 1926- 



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HAUVIN, MAHY WILL, is miw ti-iicliin^' Kiifrlish in Miss Wood's place at old Tub- 
iiian. It is said that she has introduced for book reports such books as "The Plastic Age," 
"FlaminfT Youth" and "The Bejiinning of Wisdom." 

HOLLEY, ARVIS,~is quite different from most people and loves "Skeeters" instead 
of hating them. 

JONES, EVELYN, — who is as acconnnodating as ever, has consented to a .second mar- 
riage ceremony so slie can l)e married with RL'TH SMITH. 

KELLY, LILLIAN, — a true Southerner in her childhood days suddenly and without 
warning had a deep longing for smoky Philadelphia in preference to the Sunny South as a 
residence. 

KELLY, LOIS; TRIGG, ELLEN LYON and ROWLAND, WILMINA,— are going to 
China as missionaries liut have stojiped in India with LOIS until she gets used to the un- 
clothed native children and the savage crocodiles, for as we all know it takes practice to avoid 
a crocodile while bathing. 

KUHLKE, BLANCHE, — although she has chances to ride in Rolls Royces, Packards 
and Cadillacs, still ])refers her little "Jit 'nev. 

LASS, ANNIE LAURIE and MILLS, WILLIE MAE,— are working hard on an in- 
vention to take at least ten rattles out of a Ford. Thev seem to have some rivals, however, in 
MARGARET McELMURRAY and KATE WEIGLE who are trying to do the impossible 
and take everv rattle out. 

SPANN, ALICE and POWELL, BLANCHE,— with Mr. Garrett's obliging con.sent, 
have joined Johnny J. Jones Carnival. They are called "The Long and Short of It." ALICE is 
the "LONG" woman. 

SIMONS, HAZEL and TOMMINS, MINNIE,— Minnie is taking Mr. Garrett's place 
as Principal and Hazel is taking Miss Page's place in French. 

SHERON, LUCILLE; SELLEARS, EULA and SHIVERS, ASENATH, have 
written a book on "How to keep Blonde Hair Bhinde." 

SENN. RESSIE and STEED, HELEN,— have opened a shop and have perfected the 
[lermanent wave, making it last forever and changing its name to the "Perpetual Wave." 

SAWILOWSKY, ESTELLE, — has opened a camp in Hamburg, South Carolina on the 
banks of the beautiful Savannah River for those girls desiring to get away from Augusta for 
the summer. 

WILENSKY, JENNIE,— has discovered after these years of labor at Tubman that she 
is a princess of Russia and really did not need the extensive business courses which she took. 
She is considering entering the movies as she has already received fourteen offers from leading 
producers. 

VICINATI, ROSA. — has surjirised not only the world, but also her former .school-mates 
by being the first woman to swim the English Channel. Rosa is still receiving congratulations. 







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- 1926 -- 



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History of tbie STourtl^ ^^ar ^^nfors 

* * 

X\ THE early iiutunin of tliu year of Our Lord 1922, several bands of 
Barbarian Xomads gatiiered for an attack on tlie Land of Tubman. 
From tlie western bills came tlie two tribes of IVlonte Sano and Sum- 
merville. From tbe east came tbose of Hougbton, Davidson and Central. 
From tbe nortb and soutb came tbe bosts of Woodlawn and Jobn Milledge. 
Some few stragglers joined tbe ranks from tbe remote, outlying plains. 
Against sucb overwhelming mnnbers tbe Older Inhabitants were powerless, 
tbe gates of tbe citadel fell and tbe invading army took up residence in tbe T,and 
of Tubman. A section of tbe concjuered territory was claimed by tbe invaders 
and named bv tbem tbe State of '27. 

Tbe first great task wbicb confronted this people was tbe establishment 
of an organized government. From tbe hordes was selected Louise Garrett, 
c woman of tl;e bill country, to lead tbe new state, to settle petty differences, 
and weld tbe various bands into a strong union. In celebration of tbe first 
year of peaceful abode in the Land of Tubman, tbe State of '27 joined the 
other states in a s])ring festival of great beauty. 

The second epoch in tbe history of tbe State of '27 was a period of 
steady but rather uneventful progress. More and more was the state feeling 
itself an integral part of tbe Land of Tubman. A great scientific awakening 
was taking place. From contact with the Older Libabitants it was becoming 
civilized and gradually ac(juiring culture. Tbe returns from the state election 
showed that the people had chosen Lois Van Pelt as ruler. Midway of this 
period a nation-wide athletic exhibition was held in which the State of '27 
took part with distinction. 

The third period of tiie history of tbe State was almost as uneventful 
as tbe second. Tbe fact that ])bysical education bad been compulsory had 
])roved beneficial to tbe citizens. The fine arts began to flourish. The Nation's 
Year Book contained tbe literary and artistic work of several of the citizens 
of the State of '27. Lois Van I'elt was ruler tbrough this period also. 
Toward the close of this epoch the wanderlust seized tbe peoj)le. The entire 
state made a j)ilgrimage across the river and encamped in tbe nearby woods 
for a day. 

And now we come to a tragic part of tbe history of this period. Li 
the late sunnner of tbe year 192.5 a rinnor got abroad that Tubman was to enter 
into an alliance with tiie neighboring nation, A. H. C, for the formation of a 
Super-State to be called Junior College. Tbe nnnor l)ecamc a fact. 



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It is ini])o.s.sil)Ic to exaggerate tlie liardsliips wliicli tliis plan brouglit 
upon the State of '2(5 and '27 but of tlie two, '27 was the greater sufferer. 
Even its name liad to be clianged ! It was now to be known as tlie Four Year 
Class of '26, a part and yet not a ])art of the ncigliboring state. For tliree 
years had the jieojjle looked forward to the great dramatic event known as the 
Junior Play! The heavy re<juirenients for entrance into the New Democracy 
left no leisure for drama. Art had to be sacrificed and physical culture came 
to an abrui)t end. 

But to off-set these disadvantages the citizens of '27, now Four Year 
'26, had the po.ssibility of being the first to qualify in four years for citizenship 
m the new Super-State, Junior College. A land of promise lies ahead of the 
people who four years ago invaded the land and settled down to a peaceful 
occupation of the conquered territory. 

It had been an occupation beneficial alike to the newcomers and the land 
mvaded. The Noble Spirits dwelling in the land served as ins])iration to the 
newcomers in every field of endeavor. The traditions of the land became 
dear to the hearts of the invaders and with the passing of the years, New and 
Old became as one, inseparable and devoted. On the other hand the invaders 
have contributed many an illustrious name to Tubman's Hall of Fame: 
^Marianne Ellis, brilliant essayist along scientific lines ; Doris Simmons and 
Catherine Verdery, artists of sufficient merit to exhibit in the Nation's Year 
Book : and last but by no means least, prophets who have honor in their own 
country, Louise Garrett, Lois Van Pelt, and Marguerite Hildebrandt. 

Tennyson has said, "I am a part of all that I have met." Tubman had 
left her imjiress upon each and every one of those who invaded her four years 
ago. Is it too much to hojie that from each one of them Tuliiiian has received 
some benefit.'' 

S.\i{AH B.\RKv Whitney '26. 



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Slast Mill anil ©^atam^nt 

May wc — this Class — liand down to you 
That which is good and tliat whicli is true, 
Tlie will to keep and tile courage to do, 
A heart that can sing tlie whole day through — 
May we leave these gifts to you? 

'K, THE SENIOR CLASS of Tuhman High School, realizing that our 
Hjirh School (lavs are drawinp- to a close and that during these four 



'^ 



S 



\. ^ ^ years we have acfjuired much superfluous knowledge, wish to bequeath 
our wealth of knowledge, dignity, s])ortsnianship, and charming manners to 
the following: 

ITEM I. The entire Senior class bequeath to all undergraduates, with 
much sorrow, the privilege of taking exams, with the fair warning not to study 
too hard. 

ITEM II. To the next Junior Cass, Edith Bowden leaves her many 
chewing gum wrajipers, believing that some day a prize may be offered by 
Wriglcv for the class having the largest number of Tutti Frutti, Spearmint, 
and P. K. wrappers. 

ITEM III. To Lillian Hook, I>ouise Thompson leaves her soft, 
melodious laugh. 

ITEM IV. Eugenia Hutto leaves her socks to any Freshman who will 
a])j)reciate them. 

ITEM V. To Margaret Young, Sarah Co})eland leaves her powder, 
rouge, and lijistick, hojiing Margaret will use them sparingly in French class. 

ITEM VI. Virginia Stuart bequeaths her curling irons to Marie 
Hulbert, as the said Marie stands much in need of them. 

ITEM VII. To any Junior who desires to be called witty, Elizabeth 
Pilcher leaves her unique ability to make the class laugh. 

ITEM VIII. To Margaret Minnis, Margaret Bailie bccjueaths her 
one and only sentence, "Please translate the Latin," sincerely hoping that the 
first mentioned Margaret will never make below C. 

ITEM IX. Stella Hankinson leaves to I^aura Robinson her studious 
habit.s. 

ITEM X. Julia Bell leaves her desk in time class to Betty O'Hara, 
and if Betty insists, Julia will consent to give up her alarm clock. 

ITEM XL I'o Edna Rodgers, Pearl Shimoff be(]ueaths her gigantic 
stature. 



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~ 1926- 



ITEM XII. Ruth Adams bi'(jucath.s to Ann Jones her ajipalling sense 
of humor, Iioping Ann will profit by the gift. 

ITEM XIII. Louise Garrett leaves her perpetual smile, or rather 
grin, to any Junior who wants to look happy. 

ITEM XIV. Senior B's bequeath to Junior B's their model behavior. 

ITEM XV. Tlie four-year Seniors donate to Miss Flisch a record 
whose only words will be: "When, Where, Why, and How?" 

ITEM XVI. To Miss Coniey we leave an automatic pulley, which will 
raise and lower the windows according to the temperature desired. 

ITEM XVII. In deepest affection we bequeath to the school itself 
Miss Page's anxiety over tiie valuable moments lost through unnecessary 
announcements and speeches in the Morning Assembly. 

ITEM XVIII. The varied collection of themes, accumulated during 
the many months of our stay with Miss Coniey and Miss Woods, we give and 
bequeath to the Library, asking that these valuable records be placed under 
the care of the department of Archives and Ancient History. 

(Signed) Sophie Lee Schneider, Testator. 
Witnesses : 

Elizabeth Pilcher 

Eugenia Hutto 

Marguerite Hildebrandt 



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-T LAST! It was May ITtli, 1<):5.'5, and the most talked of 
picture show of the year had finally arrived in Augusta. 
I was to see it that night! That day seemed like a year 
to me until I finally found myself seated in the Imperial 
Theatre. Horrors ! I had arrived just in time to see 
that boring "International News." But just at that moment some- 
thing in this news Hashed on the screen which caught my attention. 
I read: 

INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL 
ATLANTA, GA. 
Big Circus here has most unusual people! Miss Sarah Whitney, 
the only living woman cello-hlower, is caught liy the camera as she 
thrills her curious audience. 

'I'he next minute there was flaslied on the screen a picture of 
my old school mate, Sarah, with a large "ceUo held in her mouth, 
exhihiting her most unusual talent. I had hardly recovered from 
my amazement when another film was flashed on the screen. I 
read again: 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Another "Cinderella" adopted liy 90 year old millicuiaire ! Show- 
ered by gifts and imported cars, Virginia Stuart liecomes blushing 
bride of "Daddy" Brown. Though her husband has one foot in 
the grave, Virginia claims that she respects his money and grey 
hairs. 

ENGLAND 

Marriage of Prince of Wales ! 
Miss Frances Getzen is the much envied bride of the Prince. 
Throngs crowd the streets to glimpse the lieautiful blushing bride, 
who, it is said, captured the heart of the Prince when she rescued 
him from his 9!)th tumble from his horse. 

Would wonders never cease? Indeed, as I looked at the face of 
my former friend, I saw that this pretty lilonde had grown even 
prettier. 

AUC;USTA, GA. 

Mrs. Stella Ilankinson S — snapped as she stepped from her 
Rolls-Royce. This famous woman made a thrilling address last 
night to women, telling them, from her own experience, how a dull 
brunette may become a golden blonde over night. She says her 
secret is "Golden Glint Shampoo." 

I was enjoying this International News thoroughly. I read on: 

AUCiUSTA, GA. 
Miss Dorothy Speth makes new crush! Miss Speth has discovered 
a new crush which, it is believed, will put the orange and lemon 
flavors out of business. She states that the secret of her success 
was her wide experience with crushes at Tubman High School. 
School. 

I soon found myself looking into the face of this successful 
discoverer, who had once had a crush on me for a day and a half! 
I read: 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Funniest woman blackface comedian showing in Al Field's Min- 
strels! This charming young woman, Elizabeth Pilcher has always 
been admired for her wit and humor. 



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noiDS onD Q nan 

~ 1926- 



INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL 

ATLANTA, GA. 
It is ijiiih' noticfiible lately tluit styles are steadily froin^ Ijaek- 
ward and CDiit'oi-ininfr to those worn by the Old Grecian women. 
This news caused great joy to the former Miss Eugenia Selden. 
who can now he both comfortable and stylish, since she can wear 
sandals without injury to her famous little toe. 

DAVISBOROl'GH, GA. 

The Follies of 1985 has the honor of including Miss S — who is 
known in private life as Miss Ruth Adams. Since the death of 
the famous Will Rofrers, Miss S — is the foremost comedian of the 
world and some say she even surpasses the famous Will. 

I thoiijrht that wonders would never cease. I then saw somethinjLr 
else interestinjr: 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Title of "Mi.ss America" in Atlantic City Beauty Contest was 
awarded for 193.5 to Miss Mary Murphy, of Augusta, Ga. In 
awarding the jirize, the judges selected Miss Murphy on account of 
her extremely neat a])])earance. The judges also took into considera- 
tion the fact that Miss Murphy was on time at every session of the 
contest and in most instances was the first contestant to come. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 

The most noted film movie director in Hollywood to-day is 
.Miss Dorothy I'edersen. She bases her success u])on her wonderful 
speaking voice which is a great help in directing mammouth movies. 
She is esjiecially successful in directing mob scenes. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
Young woman makes millions overnight! Miss Miriam Grablowsky 
was famous in her school-girl days for her superb strength and 
athletic al)ility. This fact was discovered by the Arm & Hammer 
Soda Co., who paid her one million dollars for a photograph of her 
good right arm to be used in the place of the original trade mark 
])icture. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Sensational new typewriting book invented by Miss Lydia 
Holden ! This books contains but one ty]iewriting exercise! Miss 
Holden states that she invented this book for the exclusive use of 
Miss Horan of the Tubman High School, of Augusta, (Ja., in order 
that Miss Horan would not be callid upon to omit any of the 
exercises in the lesson. 

CLEARWATER, S. C. 
New Victor record creates sensation here! The new piece en- 
titled "I wish't I could Charleston" like my daughter Margie" has 
brought back into style that famous dance 'The Charleston" which 
was jiopular in 192li. This record was made when Margaret W'ood, 
formerly of .Augusta, at last learned how to do the "Charleston," 
irfter practicing nine years on it. 

LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 
Leading athletes of Georgia go to Los Angeles to compete in 
the national field meet. Those from Georgia are Miss Mary Fletcher, 
Miss Florence Markert and Miss Mary Irvine. 




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I NTKH NATIONAL NKWSRERL 
INDIA 

Slicik Al)l);i(iiil)li,i Miul his wife of India are visitirij.' at tlie White 
IlDiise. This is tlieir first visit to America since they were married 
fourteen years ago, while the wife was tlien Miss Odessa Higgs. Miss 
Hig-fTS was visiting in Wasliington when slie met tlie slieil< who was 
tlie rejiresentative tii the United States from India. 

DENVER, COLORADO 

Six hcantiful society girls of a noted southern city hike Up 
Pilve's Peali. Miss Mary Ellison, Miss May Belle Puwer,"Miss Elsie 
Hamilton, Miss Carolyn HarUy, Miss Sunie Rliodes, and Miss 
Dorothy L iclis, of Augusta, Cla.. walk u]) Pike's Peak in tliree hours 
Tliey say tliat tliis is a splendid reducing exercise. 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Patricia, famous flapjack queen, flips fifty-two pancakes a 
minute! She is recognized as champion flijiper of U. S. She 
is known througliout the world as Miss Loui.se Thompson, of 
Augusta, Ga. She started out to be the champion muffin maker 
but the work liecame too heavy. The muffins weighed ten pounds 
each. 

NEWARK, N. J. 
Deaf and dumb school opened ! The wonderful work of women 
can be shown liy the foundation of this school. Mrs. — who will 
be remembered as Miss Alice Beard will preside over the school 
and Mrs. S — who was formerly Miss F^vilee Garner, will be her 
assistant. They will both be recalled as quiet and attentive 
girls, wlio are sure to make a success of the school. 

LEESVILLE, S. C. 
Wonderful horse imitators appear at the — Theatre for the 
first time! These remarkable girls are able to prance and gallop 
just like a horse and if these unusual persons could not he seen 
Init only heard, they would certainly be taken for horses. The 
characters which make up this splendid act are Miss Frances 
AVolfe and Miss Meryl ,Iames, of Augusta, Ga. It is said that they 
liave l)oth been offered one thousand dollars a week to do this at 
tlie M Theatre in N. Y. 

MIAMI, FLA. 
Most daring woman automobilist in U. S. wins at Miami, Fla. 
Miss Ruby Hair, or Hairbreath Harry made every lady's hair stand 
on end when she flew around the race track in lier racer, Rudolph, 
going two hundred miles an hour. This is the greatest speed that 
anyone has attained on wheels. 

RIO DE JANERIO, BRAZIL 
Ciroup of women explorers discover race of giants in middle of 
Soutli American Jungle. The exploring party consisted of four 
young wonu-n of the city. The party w-as made up of Miss Minnie 
Tanenbaum, Miss Rose Rubens, Miss Inez Randall, and Miss Dene 
Steed. Miss Steed was the leader of this party. They also found 
a species of trees which will aid Miss Taneliaum in the establishment 
of a pencil factory. Wlien she was in school she was always 
without a pencil and she wishes to establish this factory so that 
.she can supply every child in the country with pencils free. 



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INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
AufruJ'tM fiirl wins world's swimming cbampionsliip ! Miss 
Catherine Verdery lirinjrs (riory on America when she success- 
fully sw-ims the English Channel. Miss Verdery says she got 
much practice for that long distance swim by swimming tlic hiiric 
length of the "Y. W." pool so many times. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
Tooth of dangerous Jumlio of Johnny J. Jones carnival is pulled 
hy Dr. Jenny I.efkowitz. Dr. Lefkowitz succeeded in carrying out 
one of the complicated methods advised by Rube Goldberg in his 
famous cartoons. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Long-sought fountain of youth discovered by Eugenia Hutto! 

Miss Hutto, like the famous Edna Wallace Hopper, has traveled 

the world over seeking youth preservers. She has discovered that 

her girlish beauty may be kept by the continuous wearing of socks. 

New "Math." teachers engaged at Tubman High School ! Miss 
l.ula Whaley, a former pupil of Tubman, will teach geometry and 
will be assisted hy Miss Ellen Smith in case she can not solve some 
oi the problems. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

"Sunshine Lucy" of Hollywood, arrives in Augusta for a three 
day performance. "Sunshine Lucy" (known to Augustans as Miss 
Louise Oliver) and her jazz band will begin an engagement at 
the Dreamland Theatre tonight. Audience is requested to leave 
peanuts at home. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
World faniiMis chemist, finds a new use for discarded rubber 
.shoes ! Mademoiselle Sophie Lee de Scbneyder by a complicated 
process is able to make velvet out of rubber overshoes. Children 
going to school welcome this with delight. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
This lady's teeth after wearing braces for ten years have become 
so beautiful that she has l)een asked to let her picture be placed 
in magazines to advertise Pepsodent Tooth Paste. This well known 
lady is Miss .Teanette Maxwell, of Augusta, Ga. 

ATLANTA, GA. 

First woman governor of Georgia sworn in at Atlanta! "Ma 
Smith" will be remembered as Miss Elizabeth Akerman, who gained 
her wide knowledge of ]>()litics through Miss Flisch's famous history 
class of Tubman High School. 

BERZELIA, GA. 

Mrs. Fairbanks and Mrs. Lovelorn stage series of interesting 
lectures on "How to Keep a Husband." These prominent women 
were before th<'ir marriage Miss Margaret Bailie and Miss Helen 
Walters respectively, who have been repeatedly pointed out as 
model girls. 




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INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Eats more sandwiches than anjbody else can in forty-five min- 
utes! Miss Mary Chew eats forty sandwiches in forty-five minutes. 
Slie attributes her ability to do this to her name. She also says 
that the more she eats tlie skinnier she gets. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Young singer scores succes, at the Redpath Chautauqua. Miss 
Marie Wells, accompanied by Miss Elizabeth Chandler, holds her 
audience spellbound. 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Miss Beulah Fender wins speed championship here; Miss Fender 
won the sixty yard dash, making it in four seconds! She says that 
her speed talent was fireatly developed during her high school days, 
when, after each lesson period, her extreme joy at hearing the bell 
ring, prompted her to rush for the door, reaching it even Ijefore the 
buzzer had stopped buzzing. Miss Fender is shown in action in this 
view of her. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Miss Elinor Dychcs, of Augusta, Ga., is elected head of the 
Orjihans" Home of Seattle. She has a great deal of patience and 
a great love for children. She will make this Orphans Home 
one of the best the United States has ever had. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Latin Language in use again! Miss Elsie Allen (shown on left) 
has started the Latin fad. Miss Allen says that she translated 
Latin so nuich for the "dumli" pupils of Tubman High School, 
that she reached the ]n)int where she speakes it automatically. 
It is whispered about, that everyone, to be stylish, must know a 
Latin word or two. Miss Allen's free school for beginners will 
be opened in September. 

How many times I remember this very girl translating Latin 
for me! 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Chemistry Laboratory "blows up." Prof. Marianne Ellis blew 
the roof off the building while experimenting with a number of 
diemicals to make a soap which would keep "her schoogirl com- 
plexion." No, her complexion was not marred l)y the accident. 
The remains of the building are shown in the picture. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
New radio announcers for station WEAF. Miss Frances Clarke 
and Miss Mary Belle Fike will begin their new position tonight. 
Miss Clarke and Miss Fike are both noted for their well-carrying 
voices, and it is certain that they will make a great success of this 
undertaking. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
Miss Doris Simmons, America's most famous interior decorator, 
gets position at the Bon Air-Vanderbilt Hotel! Miss Simmons, 
noted since childhood for her talent in interior decorating, has 
carried out this talent and is now engaged as the cliief cook of the 
lion Air-Vanderbilt Hotel. 



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INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

World clianipion type-writer becomes private secretary to the 

President. Miss Lois Van Pelt who writes one thousand words a 

minute owes her speed to the practice obtained in copying the 

Class Prophecy of 1926'. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
Augusta girl wins prize for grinning endurance contest! Miss 
Louise Garrett receives cup for grinning continually for two days. 
Miss Garrett has practiced this art for years at Tubman High 
School. 

NEW ORLEANS 
Mrs. Johnson, formerly Marguerite Hildebrandt, is seriously hurt 
by husband ! The fourth wife of Thomas Johnson, a prominent 
man of New Orleans, is suffering from injuries received from her 
husband who is said to have dragged her about by her hair, when she 
she dropped one of her homemade biscuits on his head. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Perfect Charleston dancers sign contract for Ziegfield Follies! 
These girls were picked because of their beautiful figures and their 
lightness of step. They are Iva Weathersbee, Gladys We.st, and 
I,ucile Davis. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
Great debate creates nation wide interest! All eyes turned on 
Augusta to the great debate between Miss Annie Anderson and 
Miss Julia Bell, the question being "Are Luden's cough-drops 
candy or medicine?" Miss Anderson and Miss Bell have gained 
fame from the repeated arguing of this question at Tubman. 
Another interesting feature of this debate will be the argument of 
the question "Does Spearmint loose its flavor on the bedpost over 
night," between Miss Sarah Copeland and Miss Edith Bowden. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 

Augusta girls given movie contracts as successors to many fa- 
mous stars! Miss Delia Simpson is the successor of Zazu Pitts, 
Miss Ruth Dye takes the place of Nita Naldi, the famous vampire, 
and Miss Virginia Williamson that of Mae Murray. Emmalyne 
Satcher becomes a famous Mack Sennett bathing beauty, while 
Ruth Smith plays the nun rules in place of Lillian Gish. 

Lois Van Pelt 

Marguerite Hildebrandt 

Louise Gabrett 

Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926 






THE WORLD 

BEFORE YOUI^ 

EYES 



ThE END 



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nPIDS QHD Q MQn 

~ 1926^ 



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nooa QHD Q nm 

~ 1926- 



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iEx^mptiona 



AU ^ubjprta 



Fiske, Mary 



FIFTH YEAR SENIOR 
McDaniel, Evelyn Rowlmid, Wilmina 



Bargeron, Edith 



FOURTH YEAR SENIOR 

Davidson, Lila Edwards, Florrie 



Brisendine, Elizabeth 



JUNIOR 

Minnis, Margaret 
Derrick, Harriet 



Rogers, Edna 



Bailie, Sue Walker 
Davidson, Linda 
Ciracey, Sara Bright 



SOPHOMORE 

Jones, Dorothy 
Levy, Lois 
Montgomery, Anna 



Pearson, Zella Mae 
Rosenthal, Leah 
Sniitli, Helen 



FRESHMAN 



Dunbar, Martha 
Emigh, Ellen 
Forney, Frances 



Heath, Lucile 
Hunter, Lalla 



McKinney, Margaret 
Richardson, Mary Constance 
Walker, Martha 



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TUS^ARC 




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®. H. #. to A. iR. €. 



We, the girls of Tubman, want to say a word or two of praise to the 
boys of A. R. C. We realize that even as we have struggled so have tlicy. We 
rejoice at the friendly feeling of rivalry between the two schools. We thank 
them for their hearty co-operation in all our undertakings and hope that we 
have been as much a help and an inspiration to tlieni as they have been to us. 

It is the boys of A. R. C. wlio always come to all our entertainments. 
It is the boys of A. R. C. whom we cheer on the streets as they marcii in parade. 
It is the boys of A. R. C. who arc nearest and dearest to us. We have grown 
up with these boys, we have watched their j)rogress, rejoiced in their honors, 
shared their troubles, and always tried to be true and valuable friends to them. 
As the boys of A. R. C. are the future men of our city, state, and nation, we, 
the women of tlic future, wisli for them all ])()ssible success in everything that 
they undertake, and feel sure tiiat tiieir acliievement will measure u]) to the 
promise of to-day. 



'g>o(^° °t;@«<^» e^^ °°; 




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- 1926- 



«^)CA^°°S^)C3<a<"' 




JUNIOR STVNT— First Prize on Field Day 



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~ 1926- 



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* + 



3ri|p Utrf nrinuH ST^am 

Tlic Senior .5 Basket Ball Team began their victorious career when they 
vere Sophomores by defeating all teams. As Juniors they met with the same 
good luck and in their Senior year they were as successful as before. 

There liave been few changes in the line-uj) during this time, Burch, 
Spann, Sawilowsky, and Schneider having held their respective positions the 
entire four years. 

This glory has been accomplished by the wonderful team work and 
brilliant individual jjlaying of each girl. This is a record never before equaled 
by any one team at Tubman. 



©wr WonJi^r 



We suppose some have heard about a few of the National Champion 
Athletes but all eiglit hundred of us know about the athletic ability of Alice 
Spann. 

She starred in her Freshman year, defeating Sophomores, Juniors, and 
Seniors by her athletic prowess and was proclaimed the "Champion of Field 
Day". With onlv a little ])lay on her j)art, but what we would call work, she has 
gracefully held her title of other years. We know of four cujis slie has received 
at Tubman and in all ])robability she will get a fifth. This is a record never 
before claimed by any one girl graduating from Tubman. We are proud of our 
athlete and — "Here's wishing luck to her in future years!" 




^ <gpMg)ao^)c)<^o<.^)o<^, » . . . 



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~ 1926^ 



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- 1926- 



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^^tttor 5 



Alice Si'ann.. 



..Captain 



FORWARDS 

Evelyn Burch Heline Schneider 

Frances Filler 

CENTERS 

Alice Sfann Iua Mae Hagood 

GUARDS 

Estelle Sawilowsky Alberta Thompson 



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~ 1926^ 



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~ 1926- 



t^oo^ytcn^o 



RuTii Knight Captain 

FORWARDS 
Sophie Lee Schneidee Catherine Verdery 

Maude Hurt 

CENTERS 
Mii.DHEu Benson Ruth Knight 

Mary Fletcher 



GUARDS 



Vera Hixson 
Elizabeth Akerman 



Helen Litti.eton 
Nell Trowbridge 



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~ 1926- 



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3Iw»ttor 

Elizabeth Br'sexuine Captain 

FORWARDS 
Mary Kelly Lottie Oliver 

Birdie Sawilowsky* 



CENTERS 
Edna Rogers Caroline Owens 



GUARDS 
Mary Emma Blancharij Louise Tommins 

Elizabeth Bhisendine Beatrice Hoffman 



'.€ 






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- 1926- 



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Dorothy Jones Captain 

FORWARDS 
BrLLiE Jennings Frances Pierce 

Alma Williams 

CENTERS 
HtTLDA Kesler Leonora Buckley 

Harriet Garrett 

GUARDS 
Dorothy Jones Marie Stevens 

Marie Laird Ruth Brisendine 

Delle Walton 






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~ 1926^ 



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- 1926- 



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Ph'ELYN Btrch dipt din 

Alice Spaxx.. Center forward 

Ida Mae Hacood Right inside 

Vera Hixson Right inside 

P^vELYx BuRCH Center halfback 

AIary Ikvixe Right fullback 

WixiFREi) Hallmax Center halfback 

Ruth Kxight Left halfback 

Catherixe Veudery.. Left halfback 

Graysox Wells Left wing 

Elizabeth Akermax Left fullback 

Nell Tkowhridce .^ Left halfback 

Mary Fletcher Right halfback 

Helex Littleton Right halfback 

Frances Fuller Right wing 

IvA Weathersbee _ Left wing 

Alberta Thompson Goal 






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~ 1926^ 



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~ 1926- 



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Hiinior 

Mahv Emma Blaxchard ...Captain 

Beatrice Hoffman Right inside 

Edna Knight Left wing 

Mary Emma Blanch akd Left inside 

Edna Rogers Center halfback 

Margaret Elliott ...Left fullback 

Birdie Sawilowsky Left fullback 

Ann Jones Right fullback 

Elizabeth Brisendine Center forxeard 

Lottie Oliver Right wing 

Louise Tommins Right ludfback 

Louise Brady Left fallback 

Edna Jones Goal 



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- 1926- 



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~ 1926- 



. ^>C3<^o o^Xctt^ c. - . 



Uorhrg STrams 

Dorothy Jones Captain 

AIarie Laiki) - Center fom'ord 

Dorothy Joxes Right inside 

Naomi Pomeraxce Left inside 

Leah Rosenthal Right wing 

Harriet Garrett Center ludfbaeL- 

Frances Pierce Left halfback 

Rt'th Brisendine Left h id f back 

IMaucaret (iiLsox Right fallback 

A I, MA Williams Left fallback 

Delle Walton Right halfback 

T.KONORA BrCKLEY - Gdul 



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It's Latin ; it's Freiicii ; 

It's Englisii ; it's Miitli ; 
It's tiic liardust old lessons ; 

That ain't uvcn half. 

It's Monday ; it's Tuesday ; 

It's this and it's that; 
It's the "worstest" old days, 

Cause I'm flunkin' out flat. 

It's guesses ; it's errors ; 

It's wrong and it's right ; 
It's the craziest old ways ; 

It's studyin' all night. 

It's misses ; it's wishes ; 

It's maps and it's rules ; 
But it's grand after all ; 

For it's MY Tubman School ! 

Ruth Burnette '26. 



• . • °K><=i(^<> os^)c3(^ o o(^ »p: 




g35<g&>;.;g>aog)a<^o o^)co^. . 





Mmv 




Costumfs from Si.r Pi riods 
Grecian — Uuiii Smitu 



E Ihahl I llCUl — il ARC. AUKT McEl.JIUBIlAV 




Colonial — Sue Saxon Piixkett 




The Sijiies — Wilmina Rowland 



Till F/uihtiix — Georoia Brawneh 



Today — Marv Armstrong 





ilU 




•»^)0®:{oo»^)c30J. 



^A NQIDS QHD Q nQH] 



•■'{@«(^o°^)C3<ao 



X'l' IS ill the Sophoinori' vcar that first one enters the woiiilerliil reahii ot 
science. Science is a coniplicriteil study of facts, which no one I'an 
learn excejit science teacliers. It takes in evervthing from whv moun- 
tains arc snow capped to wliy toad frogs cause warts. When first I entered 
science, innocent-eyed and trustful, a f>-ood many of my mental and moral ideals 
were sliattered. The earth, which heretofore I had firmly he'ieved to have 
been made round and solid in the beginning, with Adam and Eve living content- 
edly on it in the Garden of Eden, was not this way at all. It was first a gas; 
then it melted into a liquid, and now it is a solid. (I haven't an idea as to where 
Adam and Eve were all this time.) Its shape being round is due to its flirting 
with the other ])lanets — some kind of attraction for each other, you know. 

Our teacher is just as sweet and lovable as she can be, but her humor is 
sometimes tinge<l with sarcasm. I shall never forget the fii'st time I gave a 
rather illogical rc])ly to a question she had asked. I sat fascinated watching 
her eyebi-ows as they were raised, suspended in the air foi' a brief sp;ice, and 
then (lrop])etl with a thud. At the same moment my heart made several effective 
lea])s in the air, turned over once, then gave a jump and landed in my throat. 
The time I was late to class I experienced a cold chill that ran up and down my 
spinal cord and made me shake as if I had palsy. Heing late once was enough; 
I have not been late since. 

The science pupils are most industrious — as a result of the teacher's un- 
tiring diligence. One has to plant a garden and then watch it unceasingly, for 
if the younger children do not ap))ropriate it as a splendid ])lace for the making 
of mud pies, the neighbors' chickens take it for their hapi)y hunting-ground 
rnd it will be here that all the little chicks are taught the great art of scratch- 
ing for a living. 

\Vith worried looks, our parents eye us doubtfully as we ])erform our 
various science experiments. 'I'lie other day mother suffered a severe shock to 
find her beautiful bunch of golden daffodils sitting in a glass of red ink on the 
mantel and rapidly turning a flaming scarlet. (They were being tested for 
capillary action.) Pajja, jjoor dear, was quite startled the other night when I 
requested him to bring me home a rotten ap])le. 

The family is getting reconciled, however, and so when they come home 
to find the cut-glass sugar-bowl filled with sprouting peas and occupying the 
place of honor before the fire, only a look of Martyrdom, akin to that of Sydney 
Carton's overspi-eads their faces, for they realize that Science, like .Madame 
Defarge, has them knitted in its great pattern of victims and the only thing for 
them to do is to sit back and liohi their peace. 

T.IXDA D.WIDSOX, '28. 







&35<§p>©c3og)cx^o o:^>a.^« 



"gtaX^oc^^sX^o 



- 1926- 



^^oo^gljat^a 



^cngs to #mt tl}t (Bccasxmx 

For thf girl avIio makes 99 on a iiiatli. exam — "All Alom.'." 

For the habitual fluiiker— "Always." 

For the girl whose term average is 67 — "What'U I do?" 

For that boring teacher — "Sleepy Time Gal." 

For our Academy friend — "Tramp, Tramp, Tramj), tiie Boys are 
Marching." 

For the teacher who hears some one talking in study hall — "Who.''" 

For any of us on Tluirsday who're looking forward to tiiat Friday 
night date — "Fntil Tomorow." 

For the graduate — "After Fm gone." 

For the lazy flunker — "Drifting and Dreaming." 

For any Senior ten years hence — "Remember." 

After Biology Lab.— "Show Me The Way To Go Home." 

What Miss Flisch said when her "beau" took her iionie from school — 
"Thanks for the Buggy Ride." 

Tile great Chemistry (juestion — "Does S))earmint lose its flavor on tile 
bed-post over night.''" 

Miss Norris's delight — "Horses, Horses!" 

Answer to tiiought questions — "I Never Knew." 

A fre(iuent library visitor— "Oh, What A Pal was Mary!" 

The distance from Freshman to Senior — "There's A Long, Long Trail." 

Tile day after exams. — "Everything is Hotsy Totsy Now." 

For Miss Braddy as she walks through a crowd — "Fm Sitting On Top 
Of The World," 

Tile feeling of every Tuhmaiiite after June 10— "Then Fil Be Hapi)y." 






i^ 






»^)«®4°<'?®coO)" . - • 



- 1926- 



"K^oC^ooS^JttOo- 



^tBixmonmlB ivtmx ©ubntan ®^arl|?ra 




+ + 

Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 
Plough's Laboratory, 

New York City. 
Gentlemen: 

Your wonderful product. Black and White Cold Cream, has 
.saved my complexion from the ravages of time. I can heartily 
recommend it to anyone else who wishes to keep the bloom of 
youth in her cheeks. 

Yours sincerely, 

Annie M. Page. 




Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 
International Correspondence Schools, 

Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Dear Sir: 

You do not know what a great help your French records have 
been. Thanks to them, I now feel sure that I have acquired the 
correct French pronunciation. 

Respectfully yours, 

Helen Andebson Snow. 



£^1.// kya.'- S'lP** Medical Co., 
^'<y/ f-p -??; >^ew York City. 



Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 




Gentlemen: 

1 wish to testify as to the splendid results I have obtained from 
using Silpb Chewing Gum. I owe my silph-like form to this gum, 
and I chew it always. I recommend it to anyone who wishes to 
retain a youthful figure. 

Res|)ectfully, 

Lois Eve. 




Augusta, Ga., .May 5, 1926. 
The Murine Co., 
Chicago, 111. 
Gentlemen; 

I have enjoyed and also profited by the use of "Murine" for 
niv eves. I am no longer a wall flower, but a married woman. 
The results are all that can be desired. 

Yours very truly, 

Eliza Th-lman Sanduok. 



'K)C3(^<> »}^)o<a<> o(^ op: 




^o>^)a»^>«(^o o j@cD^. «■. 



• °g)0®{°<.?@CO(ao • 




'■^)C0(^°°^X3<a'=° 



Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 
Cosmopolitan Motoring Service, 

New York City. 
Dear Sir.s: 

I don't know what 1 would have done if it had not been for your 
booklet, "Be a Better Driver." I shall ever be grateful to you, for 
now I am considered one of the best drivers in Augusta. I am so 
proficient that I am considering going on the race track. 

Gratefully yours, 

Julia A. Flisch. 

Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 
'i'he Kuddlph W'urlitzer Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Gentlemen : 

Please send me the details of your special offer in musical 
instruments. Kver since I was five years old I have been wishing 
to l)lay the saxophone, and consider this a golden opportunity to 



learn. 



Respectfully, 

T. H. Gakbett. 



Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 
Woman's Institute, 

Scranton, Pa. 
Dear Sirs: 

I cannot express my gratitude for your valuable dressmaking 
courses, which have made me so proficient that I have become a 
sewing teaclier. A few years ago 1 did not even know how to thread 
a needle. Now I make all my own clothes, and for the first time in 
my life, I know that my clothes really have style ! 

Enthusiastically yours, 

Mabcia A. Clabk. 

Augusta, Ga., May 5, 1926. 
Aunt Jemima Mills Company, 

St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Dear Sirs: 

I am an enthusiastic user of your wonderful Aunt Jemima 
Pancake Flour. I reconnnend it to all housewives who wish to 
keep their husbands contented. 

Your ready-mixed flour enables me to get up at eight tliirty-flve, 
dress, cook breakfast, get my husband off to work and reach school 
at five minutes of nine. 

Yours truly, 

MiLDILED A. RiDGELY. 

Augusta, Ga., May fi, 1926. 
Mrs. Sarah Korer, 

New Haven, Conn. 
Dear Mrs. Rorer: 

After studying your wonderful cook-book, 1 feel sure that 1 can 
now reach any man's heart. 1 hope that I will soon have more 
definite results along this line. 

Respectfully, 

Nanct Habdock. 










9 /-^ 






°^)C3(^'> °}^)C3<^» c><^ »p; 




p:=:g)c3o:Oo<^° ■'^)cD<a'= 



•-^Jcj^J^-SDoOJo . . 



~ 1926^ 



'>K)c*^°°^)oO'' 



Ml|0's Wl?0 




Time : Modern Atmosphere : Collegiate 

Bfverlv Watson was s])rea(l across the bed attempt- 
ing to translate Latin; his roommate, Richard Stone, 
was peacefully puffing away on his pi])e and gazing out 
tlie window. 

Beverly who was of medium height and not at all 
athletic looking, had come from a little town in Ohio with 
the ambition of getting an A. B. degree. He was fun 
loving, yet serious in his work. 

Richard Stone lived in New York City. He had 
come to college with the idea that life would be just a 
series of football games one after another. He was a 
regular "ladies man," (if clothes expressed anything), 
tall, manly and one of the best athletes at college. 

Bev looked up from his work and cast a sly glance at Dick in order to 
ascertain his mood. Finding all favorable, he ventured forth. "Say, Dick, 
there's going to be a big dance Friday night ; how about lending me your ^tux'.'"' 
"Nay, nay, little one. That's impossible for what would I appear in 
if I happened to have a generous turn of mind and lent you my 'tux'.'' 
Reckon you'll have to stay home and "Keep the Home Fires Burning." 

Friday night came and Bev was seen studyitig hard wliile Dick attired 
himself in the latest fashions. 

"So long, old man. Go to bed early." 

It was just after the intermission and tlie orchestra was striking up 
that well known tune, "Yes, Sir, That's My Baby," wiien Dick espied a ravish- 
ing blonde being carried away by one of his classmates. After standing in 
line for nearly lialf an hour, Dick finally got a chance to dance with iier. 

Before the last piece had been played, he was dated up for the next 
week with this dazzling blonde, who had felt like a feather in liis arms. He had 
asked to take her home, but she had j)olitely refused, saying tliat slie nmst go 
home with her escort. Well never mind! Wouldn't lie make Bev jealous when 
he told him of this wonderful girl ! 

O well, it was just twelve; he would go by the S. A. F,. "frat iiouse" and 
borrow a couj)le of cigarettes. 

When at Ifist he returned to his room, Bev was sitting on the edge of the 
bed still pouring over his Latin book. 

"Bev, I've fallen hard. It's tiie sure thing this time." 
"Where did you meet her.'"' 
"At the dance tonight." 

"Yes, I know all about her," rejoined Bev, hiding a smile, as he pushed 
a blonde wig farther under the bed. 

Virginia Fleming '26 






Ml|at iMy Olr^at <Bran^motl|^r ®0l5 iH^ 



CD 



y Great Grandmother told me that long, long ago when all the world 
and Mr. Garrett were young, that she went to school in an old church 
building on Reynolds Street right in amongst wild men and 
cotton bales. 



Mr. Garrett was the principal of Tubman then as now. His hair was 
black as a raven's wing and he walked in an atmosphere of manly beauty. He 
was followed by loving looks and soulful sighs ; even the Freshmen realized he 
was the stuff that dreams are made of. 

But he had his difficulties, for his stern and fatherly interest was often 
misinterpreted. Once when trying to turn a wayward daughter to the straight 
and narrow path of discipline, he said, "Young lady, I want to have a heart to 
heart talk with you." He realized his error when on February fourteenth he 
received a lovely Valentine: two lovers clasped in a warm embrace were seated 
on a rosy heart, bearing the words, "I want to have a heart to heart talk with 
you." 

One morning the least observing pupil could tell that something of 
moment had happened. Mr. Garrett's face wore a look of dreamy exaltation 
and thereafter each spare moment he could be found playing marvelous tunes 
with one finger on the tin-panny piano in the recreation hall; it was even rumor- 
ed that he was taking nnisic lessons of a fair lady. A few weeks later his engage- 
ment was announced to a charming Augusta musician. After that he rather 
lost his glamor, no longer the possible "he", but just the ])rincipal of the 
Tubman. 

My Great Grandmother also says that in her days young ladies were 
very modest, for once when she was Prince Charming in a play the nearest to 
pants that she dared wear was a long black satin skirt ; furthermore when her 
classmates played basketball they did so behind high brick walls over which no 
masculine eye dared peer. When the young ladies graduated, all the beautiful 
dresses were hung three inches from the floor and the exercises were 
h.eld in the opera house. 

My Great Grandmother marvels at our freedom, our beautiful school, 
our bobbed hair, and our short skirts, but most of all at the endurance of that 
romantic figure of her youth, Mr. (iarrett. 



<>g)«®?o'>?®0<a» 



- 1926- 



•'^)c3<^»°^)a<§J<" • 



/=^ 



An Escape 



+ + 




the radio. Pamela 



Pamela sat up in bed. What \va.s that she heard? A soft foot- 
step ! A burglar in the room below ! She quickly slipped on her 
kimona, picked up the poker, and stealthily descended the stairs. 
She stood in the door of the library. Then she saw a man's back bent 
over the safe, and in the other corner, a luminous pool of light. She 
wavered there, terrified — afraid to strike. She wondered what the 
light was, but she could not decide. Then suddenly, there came a 
voice from the direction of the light. "Hands up !" it said. The 
hurglar promptly obeyed. So did Pamela. "Right about face and 
march I" Pamela marched. So did the burglar. Right out of the 
French window he marched, and he didn't come back either. 

Pamela stood there, bewildered, until she heard these familiar 
words: "Station X. Y. Z. broadcasting, Hollywood, California. The 
next act of this exciting play will be given Wednesday night at 
twelve o'clock." Then Pamela understood. Her brother Jack 
had left the radio connected so as to tune in on X. Y. Z. at twelve, 
and had forgotten it. That luminous light came from the bulbs of 
■limbed the stairs and laughing softly said, "Thank you. Jack." 

Ann Jones. '27. 



WITH APOLOGIES TO K. C. B. 



Did you ever 

Answer those two letters 

And tell James 

That you loved him 

IJetter than all your earthly possessions, 

But that you were powerfully sorry. 

You would have to break that date, — 

Your sister 

Was now home from college? 

And then wrote Henry, 

Telling him he was vour *'"rnal Flame of I.ove 

.\nd that you would he with him tonight 

In s))ite of everything? 

Then mailed them both at once? 

That night 

When James came 

The first thing you saw in liis pocket 

Was your envelope addressed to James 

And your note starting^ 

My dearest Henry. 

You never did? 

Well, I have. 

LnxEY White, '26. 



=g>C3(^°''5^)C3<a»C3(^op: 




■^°>®a«S)cX^o .;®co<^. 



°^>«<©?°o?®CO<^° 



MPIDS PHD Q f1Qn 

- 1926- 



JVin't iUtfe Awful in tJ^^ Moulds 



•f + 



HAVE you ever stepped from tlic diizzling sunliglit into tlie stygian 
interior of a moving picture theater? The usher steathily approaclies 
and with eat-like tread conducts you endlessly down, down almost to 
the very front row. Vou stagger and stumble in his wake, with all the grace of 
the principal in a game of Blindnuin's Huff. Finally you find your seat, or 
think you do at least, and sit relievedly in the lap of a huge, fat gentleman. 
You apologize and gro])e your way to an empty chair at last, but perilously 
near the orchestra. Your foot crunches noisily among some peanut hulls on the 
floor, and an exclamation that sounds remarkably like "Confound it" escapes 
your irate neighbor on the left. Kventually peace is thine! 

The movie moves on. The villain pursues the heroine to the edge of a 
steep cliff, from which she jumj)s rather than be kissed by this be-moustached 
caveman. Off she goes — ker s])lash! The little man with the cymbals clangs 
them together in your ear. Someone in the back of the theater breaks the 
reverberating silence with a loud "Ha! ha! The water almost soaked me!" 
The heroine swims to shore, which looks about two miles away. When she 
reaches it and climbs u[)on the banks of Niagara Falls, her hair is still in place 
and as curly as before. But what disturbs you most is that her clothes are 
not wet. Don't tell me that miracles don't hapjjen now! "Sir S(|uibbs still 
pursues her," is read aloud by someone behind you. "Oh yeali, I told you 
he was, didn't 1? Now watch the hero grab 'er !" (I wonder why people who 
always know what is going to happen bother to sit through a movie!) Your 
foot jerks from numbness; you fumble with your shoe lace a moment and look 
up to see that the hero, who has saved his "loved" one, is just about to kiss 
her; then a head bobs in front of you and you miss the best part of the picture. 
Disgusted through and through, you get up to leave but are detained by some 
fast holding chewing-gum. You are furious by now and depart in wrath, amid 
the howling of a three-year-old. You declare by all tluit's good you'll NEVER 
go to a movie again. But ah — don't tell anybody, not "again" until the next 
time. 

— Sarah Yeak rv '28. 



■>^>c3(^°°j©i3<^»<=>©3°°: 




'>:g!)c3=g)«(^o o^)co^o 



°^)a©{oo«@ccxa» 



MQIDS QHD Q nQH] 

~ 1926- 



•■K)ca;^°<>SOcca^o = 



m^arti 59urtJtg tl^r Noon ^tamp^lt? 



"What a mob!" 

"Oucli, tliat's n\y corn." 

"How many of tlicsc for a iiickul?" 

"Gee, I've never seen siuli a lino." 

"And tlien Jou got mad and I ^aid ' '." 

"What did vou make on that test?" 

"Tlii.s chocohite burnt my tongue off!" 

"Lend me a nickel." 

"Gosh! But slie di(hi't miss givino- us a lesson for tomorrow!" 

"Mrs. Parks, are there any sandwiches left.^^" 

"I'm sorry, but I've got to stay for Lab." 

"Did slie get you in history today.''" 

"Now wliat do I want to eat .''" 

"I'd love to. but I've only got a dime." 

"Miss Green called the roll today, of all days." 

"Who wants to sell a street car ticket.'" 

"Have you been to the Horse Show.?" 

"Grab me a hot dog, please." 

"I wrote a note to mv crush in English class." 

"Which cakes do you get the most of.''" 

"Did you get a bid for the dance.''" 

"Who'll translate my Spanish for me.'" 

"I'm trying to gain, so please pile on the whipped cream." 

"Why weren't you in Study last period.'" 

"I've lost a WHOLE i)ouMd." 

"Where's Sarah.?" 

"Show Me the Way To (io Home." 

"What tlo you go to next.''" 

"Have you got any of your typewriting.''" 

"Oh Heck, there's the bell and I haven't cracked mv book." 

M.\iu:.\itKT Bush '2i. 



'gXaC^o oJ^)c3<ao o(^ 'P^M 




t<p;*fei>a'>^>«(^o 0^)C3<^» . 



" °gta>©5oo}@co<ao , o . 






''K)C3<^oo^)CO<^o 



3lok^a 



T. H. S. 

The Freshmen thnik autos come from 
China hecaiise they go "Honk! Honk!" 
T. H. s. 

Chemistry Prof: "Can you tell me ahout 
nitrates!'" 

Student: "They— well— er— they're lots 
cheaper than day rates." 

Fresh: 'Do you think Algehra is hard?" 
Senior: "Why no. do you?" 
Fresh: "Well, I think it is easy to write 
liut hard to speak." 

Dumh Fresh: "Fm stuck on this example." 
.Vlpehra teacher: 'Oh! Fm so glad you eves his toes turn up. 
like it." 



Teacher: Frances, where did Caesar die? 

Frances: On inige one hundred and tw^en- 
ty-five. 

T. H. s. 

Teacher: Sue, u.se the right verh in this 
sentence: The toast was drank in silence. 

Sue: The toast was ate in silence. 
T. H. s. 

One teacher: What do you think of Edna 
Ferher? 

Second teacher: Sh-h-h ! I make it a rule 
never to speak of any pupil in puhlic. 

T. H. S. 

Sam: He's so tiirht that when he bats his 



Cleniniie: "Oh! Milly, Fm engaged." 

Milly: "To whom?" 

Clemmie: "I don't know his last name hut 
he goes to college and he wore a hlack 
suit." 

T. TI. s. 

Miss Woods: "Why did Hawthorne name 
one of his novels 'The Scarlet I^etter'?" 

Senior: "I don't know, unless he wanted 
it to lie read." 

T. H. s. 

Miss Green: "Mv, how short vour coat is!'' 

Jliss Comey: ''Oh, that's all right. It'll 
he long enough before I get a new one." 
T. II. s. 

Hetty: "Yes, Mother, tlianks to my cook- 
ing school course at TL'BMAX, I know all 
about marketing. The only thing that 
l>uzzles me is whether you get gravy from 
the butcher {)r the grocer." 

T. H. s. 

Miss Woods: "What is an usher?" 

Bright Senior: "The man who takes tlic 
leading part in the theaters." 

The fur lined bathtub goes to the girl 
who asked a teacher to open the windows, 
as .she could not sleep without |>lenty of 
fresh air. 

T. II. s. 

History teacher: "What is the military 
formation used by the Honian Army?" 

Freshman: ".\ small but powerful square 
called the phenolax." 






"What a heck of a trip !" said the sales- 
man as he fell down the steps. 

F.ssay on Man: At ten, a child; at twenty, 
wild; at thirty, tame (if ever); at forty, 
wise; at fifty, rich; at sixty, good or never. 

"Are you quite sure you love nie truly?" 
demanded the jealous girl. 

"As sure," murmured the tactful crook, 
"as my name is ,Iohn Smith." 
T. H. s. 

Guest: "Waiter, there is a fly in my ice 
cream." 

Waiter: "Let him freeze and it will teach 
him a lesson. The little rascal was in the 
soup last night." 

T. H. s. 

"Ah," remarked the eminent surgeon con- 
versationallj-, as he operated on Mr. V'an- 
derslip, "at last Fm breaking into society." 
T. H. s. 

Servant: "The lA'ons are calling. Sir." 

Master: "Very good, show them into the 
den." 

Editor: "Your so-called poetry is just an 
escape of gas." 

Poet: "So! Something must be wrong 
with the meter." 

T. H. s. 

"I want tax reform," he bellowed, "I want 
tariff reform! I want trust reform! I want 

social reform ! I wan "Chloroform !" 

Shouted a man in the audience. 




i:<§P:»^>C5"K)C3(^o » J@CO<^o 



-^^^^^-^^^mm;g^W^'^^^^ 



^fe^ 







THOL'QHTS 
A Book Box 
created I?}; Virgi 
Hollingsivorth 



The South's Contribution 
to the world's fine things 

Sold at America's /iner drug storei 
VIRGIL HOLLINGSWORTH. AUGUSTA, GA. 



^? 






PRINTERS BINDERS 
ENGRAVERS 



We invite the trade of 
those who appreciate 
the prompt and intelli- 
gent handling of their 
business. 

We are the printers of 

this volume of 
MAIDS AND A MAN 



820 Reynolds Street 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
Phone 667 



+ 



HERRF-JONES COMPANY 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS & STATIONERS 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 

OFFICIAL JEWELERS FOR 

TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS RINGS & PINS 

ORDERS FILLED ANY TIME— FOR ANY YEAR 



- ,.- + 



He: "Do you like to play ci-o()iiet?" 
She: "No, Mamma says it's wicket." 

A bird in the hand is had table manners. 

The heifrht of laziness — A man who drinks salt water with his meals so he 
won't liave to season his food. 



WASH AT 



+ 



HULSE LAUNDRY 

"JUST A GOOD ONE" 

A. H. HARDY, Prop. 
513— PHONES— 6871 



THE 

CITIZENS & SOUTH ERN 

BANK 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

Interest Paid on Savings Quarterly. Start Life Right by Opening 

a Savings Account 

TOTAL ASSETS OVER $70,000,000.00 

NO ACCOUNT TOO LARGE— NONE TOO SMALL 

ACTS AS EXECUTORS, GUARDIANS, TRUSTEES 



•A SPORTINO CHANCE" 
Mother: "Where has Owen gone?" 

Father: "Well, if the ice is as strong as he thinks it is he's gone skating — if 
not, he has gone swimming!" 



DELICIOUS SOUTHERN BISCUITS 
MADE FROM 

EARLY BREAKFAST 
SELF-RISING FLOUR 

CLARK MILLING CO. 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



— + 



100,000 Boys and Girls 

daily enter school buildings constructed by us. These 
buildings include 

The Houghton Grammar School 
The Monte Sano School 
The Tubman High School 
The Richmond Academy 

[Under Construction] 

The greatest pleasure that comes from our work lies in 
the knowledge that we are doing something towards the 
education of the coming men and women of the South. 

PALMER-SPIVEY CONSTRUCTION CO. 

BUILDERS 

Augusta, Ga. Charlotte, N. C. 



STELLING SHOE CO. 

810 BROAD STREET 

RETAILERS OF 

FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

"Your Inspection Invited" 



JUST WHY CAN YOU CALL A GIRL 
A chicken but not a hen, 
A terror but not a friffht, 
A kitten l)ut not a cat, 
A vision but not a sight? 

— Princeton Tiger. 



,.„_.„-,,. 



CONGRATULATING THE 
GRADUATING CLASS OF 1926! 

Our best wishes on this commencement occasion. May the future 
be as happy and fruitful as the past school, days at "Tubman." 

J. B. WHITE & CO. 



+ — . 4. 



1 MURPHY STATIONERY CO. 

High Grade Correspondence Paper and Cards 

ENGRAVING 
GRADUATION AND GIFT 
I BOOKS 

Waterman Fountain Pens 
KODAKS and FILMS 

—f^—"^—" • ■• ■" ■■^— ■■^— ■■^— »i^— ■■■^— 1»^— «»— ^i*^— i*^— ii^— »»^— ii^— i.-tj* 



+ -., 



Compliments of 

AUGUSTA LUMBER COMPANY 



COOPER HARDWARE CO. 

TWO STORES 
828 BROAD ST.— 877 BROAD ST. 

SPORTING GOODS AND HARDWARE 



..-+ 



ENJOY THIRST- 
DRINK 



IN A STERILIZED BOTTLE 

AUGUSTA COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

5th & REYNOLDS STS. PHONE 33 
+ + 



■-+ 



SAXON-CULLUM SHOE CO. 

922 BROAD ST. ALWAYS BUSY PHONE 978 



Willie .stood on the railroad track; 

He didn't liear the hell. 

The engine went to Halifax — 

And I know where you thoujrht Willie 

Went, but he didn't, hecau.se he was walkinfr on the other track. 



ENTERPRISE MANUFACTURING CO. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



S. A. FORTSON. President 
M. B. GOODWIN, Secretary 



..-+ 



THE NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK 

••AUGUSTA'S ONLY NATIONAL BANK" 

A NATIONAL BANK 

With 

A SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

In Which 

EVERY TUBMAN GIRL IS CORDIALLY INVITED 
TO HAVE A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

START WHILE YOUNG 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



A PERFECT ILLUSION 
"Yes, Jim, Alice siiid that last nifrlit slie dreamed she was daneiiifr with yon." 
"You thrill me all ti) pieces, Hill." 

" and then she woke u)i to tind her kid brother )ioiin(linjr her feet with 

a flat iron." 



PUT AN OVERCOAT ON YOUR HOUSE 

How can this be done? By veneering your old house with 
weather, heat, time resisting Brick. This will renew and give 
years of added life to your building, add to its beauty, and make 
it much more comfortable to live in. 

Brick and Hollow Building Tile are also the finest materials 
you can use if you are erecting a new building. We can furnish 
you with Common Brick, Face Brick, and Hollow Building Tile 
of the Highest Quality. 

GEORGIA-CAROLINA BRICK CO. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



...+ 



Compliments of 



MODJESKA 



IMPERIAL 



RIALTO 



THEATERS 



TO PROVE: A rotten potato is a beehive. 

1. A rotten potato is a 'specked tater.' 

2. A spectator is a beholder. 

3. A "bee holder" is a beehive. 
THEREFORE: A rotten potato is a beehive. 



' UxruA. Sicrtu-u4i^-uciuA.e4 Leaved /Ivikln^ UnioCd 




THE ENGR^AViGS USED IN THIS BOOK WERE MADE IN i 
AUGUSTA^-g'THE GARDEN CITY OF THE S( 




tgomer 

Photo-Engravers— Ar 



QUALITY 
GARDEN HOSE 

HUTT'S 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES 
611 BROAD STREET 



+-.. 



+-.. — 



* + 



GOLDBERG'S 

LADIES' OUTFITTERS 

Our Authhentic Styles and Mod- 
erate Prices have earned for this 
Store the Reputation of 

"THE STORE OF 
BETTER VAULES" 



"N':iU};lity, Niiiifrlity," said tlie sweet youiiji tiling' as the seore keeper ]mt u)) 
double zeri). 



,.-^ 



SOUTHERN FINANCE CORPORATION 

REAL ESTATE— MORTGAGE LOANS 

FIRE AND CASUALTY INSURANCE 

RENTING AND LEASING 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

SOUTHERN FINANCE BUILDING 



+-.. 



GIRLS' SHOP 

We specialize in Hosiery, Athletic Sweaters, Coats, 

Regulation Middies and Dresses for Girls. 

Madge Evans Hats for Girls 




£STJIBLISHEO OVER HALF A CEMTUHY 



Compliments of 

GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
OFFICERS 

CHARLES H. PHINIZY — President 

SAMUEL MARTIN — Vice-President 

HAL D. BEMAN — Vice-President 

A, B. KITCHEN — Cashier 

F. B. POPE — Asst. Cashier 

JAMES J. BRESNAHAN — Asst. Cashier 



THE DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS 

"Could I see {reneral Blank?" 
"No, general Blank is sick." 
"What made liim sick?" 
' Oh, things in general." 



i 



H. H. CLAUSSEN'S SONS 

Bakers of Quality Bread and Cake 



I 
I 

! 

i 

1 



STRENGTH— SAFETY— SERVICE 

UNION SAVINGS BANK 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
INTEREST PAID QUARTERLY 



+— 



Policeman — Speak to the jiidfje. 
Prisoner — Hello, jiidfre! 
Judge — 20 years — next case. 



GEORGIA-CAROLINA DAIRY PRODUCTS CO. 




'A Perfect Food" 



*-.. 



—BRICK— 

Manufactured by 

MERRY BROTHERS 

ARE HIGH GRADE AT RIGHT 

PRICES 
25 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS 

i Large Capacities — Operatinjj Year Round 
5 Correspondence Invited 



! 

j Marion Bldg. 

i 

+ 



Phones 571-572 



■+ +- 



International 
Vegetable Oil 
Company, Inc. 



CO IV FEED 



"Never mind," said tlic hero wlio liad just lost liis left arm. "I still have the 
right to love you." 



4*— »N^II> 



ORIOLE RANGES 



BAKE 

BROIL 

BOIL 



BETTER 



ASK YOUR GAS COMPANY 

ABOUT 

OVEN HEAT CONTROL 



THE GAS LIGHT CO. 



I I 



TROLLEY TRANSPORTATION 

IS 

SAFEST 

MOST DEPENDABLE 

CHEAPEST 

HYDRO POWER 

IN EVERY QUANTITY 

FOR EVERY PURPOSE 
Reliable Service Reasonable Rates 

AUGUSTA-AIKEN 
RAILWAY & ELECTRIC 

CORPORATION 

+ 



-■"-+ 
I 



+- 

i 



Established 1856 

THE PERKINS 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

Yellow Pine Lumber 

MILL WORK, DOORS, 

SASH AND BLINDS 

620 13th Street Phone 711 

Augusta, Ga. 



Sporting Goods 

Jantzen Swimming Suits 

Tennis Supplies 

BOWEN BROS. HDW. CO. 

829 BROAD STREET 



Customer: "Have you any eggrs thiit liave no chickens in them?" 
Grocer: "Yes ma'am; duck eggs." 



"- + 



HEATH, BOLSTER & 
TURNER 

Wholesale 

FRUITS, PRODUCE, 

GROCERIES 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Phones 1271-1272 



STULB'S RESTAURANT 

BROAD ST— AT THE MONUMENT 
Home Cooking Southern Style 

OPEN 7 A. M. to 12:00 MIDNIGHT 

Heffeman and Byne 

Proprietors 
Box Lunches for Outing Parties 



DRINK 

ORANGE CRUSH 

IN BIGGER 

KRINKLYS 



..-+ 



HANSBERGER'S 
PHARMACY 

JNO. A. BRESNAHAN, Prop. 

DRUGS, 

TOILET ARTICLES 

AND CANDY 

934 Broad Street 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



+-..- 



"Wliat di> you hear from your son at college?" 
'Well, the local hank reports hiui well and happy." 



JOHN W. DICKEY 

STOCKS, BONDS AND 
REAL ESTATE LOANS 

MASONIC BUILDING 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



STARK 

CLEANING & DYEING 

PHONE 769 



+ - 
+ - 



EMPIRE LAUNDRY 

PHONE 51 



+ 



+ " 



J C. T. GOETCHIUS & BRO. 

f DRUGS— SODA— KODAKS— CANDY 

702 Broad St. Phone 619 AUGUSTA, GA- 



^.. ... 

Buy The Tubman Girls 
GRADUATION GIFTS 

AT 

SCHWEIGERT'S 

THE LEADING JEWELER 

+ 

^. 



LOMBARD IRON WORKS & SUPPLY CO. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

MACHINERY— SUPPLIES— REPAIRS 

EVERYTHING FOR THE MILL 

+ + 

, ^ 

PERSONAL BEAUTY 

IS A BETTER INTRODUCTION 
THAN ANY LETTER— DIOGENES 

ELIZABETH ARDEN 

PREPARATIONS COMBINE ALL THAT COULD BE DESIRED 

TO MAKE YOUR DRESSING TABLE COMPLETE 

YOU WILL FIND AT OUR STORE A COMPLETE LINE OF 

BABANI PERFUME 

GARDELLE'S 

726 BROAD STREET 









BUY YOUR GRADUATION 






GIFTS AT 




M. 


TANENBAUM 




FINE 


REPAIR WORK 


974 


BROAD 


ST. PHONE 3581 



—4. 



I Why is Youth? 

I The answer, enigmatic as it may seem, 

I is simple. The answer is Health. 

1 For your health's sake. Take 

I Chiropractic Adjustments. 

I DR. W. D. REYNOLDS 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Palmer Graduate 

328-334 MASONIC BUILDING 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

j AUGUSTA'S MOST COMPLETE 
j CHIROPRACTIC 

I LABORATORY 

I 

i 

+_. . ... 



1. Bread is a necessity. 

2. Necessity is tlie inotlier of invention. 

3. A steam engine is an invention. 

TO PROVE: Bread is the iniitlier of tlie steam enjrine. 
THKRF,F()HI5: Bread is the mother of the steam enfrine. 



— + 



GIRLS 



—Will Be 



GIRLS 

That's why they come to us 
for their Furniture 

THE 

JONES FURNITURE 

COMPANY 

1010 BROAD ST. 

GIRLS, WHEN YOU GET THE 
BOY, WE HAVE THE I 

FURNITURE 



REMINGTON PORTABLE 
TYPEWRITERS 

Have Standard Keyboard Just 
Like the Big Machines 

IDEAL FOR HOME USE AND 
TRAVELING 

L J. HENRY 

THE TYPEWRITER MAN 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



I AUGUSTA OPTICAL CO. 

Specialists in 

OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS 

803 Broad St. Masonic BIdg. 

Business Phone 2664 

Augusta, Ga. 



S. M. 


WHITNEY CO., 

AUGUSTA, GA. 


INC. 


COTTON FACTORS 




ESTABLISHED 1868 





MARSH ALL-CORLEY 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Distributors 

Franklin and Oldsmobile 
Motor Cars 



4.-.. 



101-103-105 Seventh St. 



Phone 1364 



H. SHMERLING 

JEWELER 

CASH OR CREDIT 
DIAMONDS — WATCHES 

Phone 1101 910 Broad St. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



+ -»» 



RICE-O'CONNOR SHOE CO. 

SHOES HOSIERY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

856 BROADWAY 



+ 



..- + 



J. H. Flythe J. W. Flythe 

Sales Mgr. Supt. 

WESTOVER CEMETERY 

PERPETUAL CARE 
Augusta. Ga. 

■Show me the resting place of the dead 
and I will judge the living." — Benjamin 
Franklin. 

Nothing is too good for .\ugusta and 
vicinity ! That's why we developed West- 
over Cemetery. 

Lots sold oit easy terms. 
Executive offices — 105-106 Masonic Bldg. 
Phone 653 






+ 



J. ROY COOPER & CO. 



COOPER POLICIES PAY 



• » " " "T 


MEET ME AT 


MACKS 


Macks Chop-Suey 


9137 






W. p. MANNING 
MUSIC CO. 

STEINWAY PIANOS 

BRUNSWICK— 

PANATROPE— RADIOLAS 

AND RECORDS 

EVERYTHING MUSICAL. 



McGOWAN-MOTES 
MOTOR CO. 

Authorized 

Ford, Fordson and Lincoln 
Sales and Service 

519-21-23 Broad St.— Phone 357 



WILLIS IRVIN 



ARCHITECT 



617-18-19-20 Southern Finance Bldg. 



Augusta, Georgia. 



+— 



MCDONALD'S 



GROCERIES 



THE FASHION 

LADIES' WEARING APPAREL 

■WHERE QUALITY TELLS" 
1016-1018 Broad St.— Phone 132 

"Congratulations to the Senior 
Class." 



WYNN-BAILEY & CO. 

Wholesale 

Fruits, Produce, Groceries 

Phones 3436-3436 945 Fenwick St. 



MRS. S. E. BELL 
Importer Milliner Maker 

Exclusive but Never Expensive 

The Hat for the Woman — The Hat for the 
Dress — The Hat for the Occasion 

827 Greene St. 



■-+ 



S. R. KELLY & SON 
Marble and Granite Memorials 

Ninth and Fenwick Streets 
PHONE 2129 



+-.. 



GEORGIA VITRIFIED 

BRICK AND CLAY 

COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



PLANT AT 
Campania, Ga. 



OFFICE 
Lamar Bldg. 



I THE REALTY 

I SAVINGS & TRUST CO. 

i 

SOLICITS AND APPRECIATES 

THE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS OF 

YOUNG LADIES 

WE ' 5l% on time certificates 
PAY i 5% on savings accounts 



JOHN PHINIZY 

A. B. VONKAMP 

JAMES R. LEAGUE 

GEO. SANCKEN 

T. D. CASWELL 

P. H. RICE 

C. K. LAWRENCE. JR. 

J. FRANK CARSWELL 

L. LEE ETHEREDGE 

LEROY W. LYETH 

RUSSELL K. WHALEY 

JAMES B. MULHERIN 

WM. P. WHITE 

C. H. PHINIZY, SR. 

GEO. G. BELDING 



"Boll, (Iciir, you luivfii't ti)l<i nie you loved 
nie toniplit !" 

""S" fiiiiiiy, I told .snmebodv." 



L. J. SCHAUL & CO. 
Jewelers 



..- + 



THE NATIONAL 
CASH REGISTER CO. 

R. H. JOHNSTON, Sales Agent 

317 Jackson St. Augusta, Ga. 

PHONE 8777 



+ ■ 



.._+ 



1 



J. B. G. West L. O. West 

WEST BROS. MOTOR CO. 

Willys-Knight and Overland 
Motor Cars 

SALES— SERVICE— PARTS 
111-113 Eighth St., Phone 2278 

Augusta, Ga. 



+ 



LORICK & VAIDEN 

Insurance 

Life Accident 

Group Health 

Augusta, Ga. 



-+ 

I 





_.,_. „_.,_.. — ._.._„_ J. 

ESTABLISHED 1866 


F. 


PHINIZY & COMPANY 


Insurance Real Estate 




Loans Renting ! 


+ 


Augusta, Ga. 

._.._- 



+ — 



CULPEPPER BROTHERS 

FURNITURE 

1019 BROAD ST. 

Augusta, Ga. 



I 



C. M. HILL SERVICE 
STATION 

Repairing of Buicks and Fords a 
Specialty 

EXIDE BATTERIES 



565-667 Broad St 
4._,„ „ „„ „„ „ ,„. 



Phone 1286 



I 



+ 



WM. 0. WHITE 

JEWELER 
"Gifts that Last" 

864 BROAD ST. 

Augusta, Ga. 

+ 



Scott Nixon Waller G. Fargo 

NIXON AND FARGO 
Realtors — Insurers 

104 Masonic Bldg. Phone 282 

Augusta, Ga. 



+- — " 



E. J. Hernlen 



Fred Herring 



WIRTZ & HERNLEN 
COMPANY 

Dealers in 

Hardware and Farm Machinery 
The John Deere Line 

601 BROAD ST. PHONE 3604 } 

I 
+ 



WITH BEST WISHES FOR 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

JCHN F. CARSWELL 

Groceries and Meats 

842-6 Liberty St. Phones 9380 and 9171 



+ . 

LAND DRUG COMPANY 


Ccr. Broad & Marbury Sts. 


Augusta, Ga. 


R. H. LAND F. J. BODEKER 




SHERON'S 



578-80 BROAD STREET 



•i* 


E. O. COOPER 


Real Estate — Renting 


Fire Insurance 


MASONIC BUILDING 


Eighth Street Entrance 


Augusta, Ga. 


+- 



+ 



R. E. ELLIOTT & SONS 


FUNERAL HOME 


Private Ambulance Service 


Corner Telfair and Twelfth Streets 


Augusta, Ga. 


Phone 606 Res. Phone 1646 
+ J. 



.. . ^ 

Compliments 
of 

AUGUSTA GROCERY 
COMPANY 



I 
-+ 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

N. HILDEBRANDT 



ATLANTIC ICE & COAL CO. 

Ice, Coal and Cold Storage 
Phones 332-333 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

SMITH BROTHERS 



VISIT 

THE COZY STORE 

Where you will find new and well selected 
stocks of 

MILLINERY 

UNUSUAL GIFTS 

NOVELTIES 

E. C. BALK & CO. 



918 BROAD ST. 



PHONE 382 



AUGUSTA SHOE 
REPAIRING 

J. Sawilowsky's Shoe Renury 
975 Broad St. Phones 943-3714 

Augusta, Ga. 



+ -.. 



LET US DO YOUR REPAIR 
WORK 

We Will Gladly Send For Car 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

We Have Up-to-date Repair 

Equipment 

None But Genuine Ford Parts Used 

LOMBARD MOTOR CO. 

719 Broad Street Phones 2249 and 3191 

Opposite Monument 



SHAPIRO'S 

1036 Broad St. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 






MILLIGAN ADV. SERVICE 

POSTER ADVERTISING j 
£49 Walker Street 
Augusta, Georgia 



+ 



AWNINGS PORCH SHADES 
WALL PAPER 

T. G. BAILIE & CO. 

712 BROAD ST. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

ARRINGTON BROTHERS 
&C0. 



+ — 






Say It With Flowers 
from 

BALK'S NURSERY 

226 GREENE ST. 



.~ + 



"BREAD IS THE 



STAFF OF LIFE" 

IDAHOME FLOUR (Plain) 
TWINDA FLOUR (Self-Rising) 

Makes Perfect Biscuit, Rolls, 
Bread and Pastry 

CARR-LEE GROCERY CO. 

Wholesale Distributors 






AUGUSTA DRUG CO. 

Wholesale Druggists 

305 to 311 JACKSON ST. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 



+ -.. 



-... h 



■-+ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

GEORGIA IRON WORKS 



,.-+ 





Maxwell Brothers 




FURNITURE 


937 


Broad St. Phone 836 




Augusta, Georgia 



J— 


' ' 




For Pictures and Picture-frames, 




Book Ends and Art Materials 




Call at 




HARPER BROS. 




426 8th Street 




Phone 730 


••- 


+ 



+— 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE 
AUGUSTA CHRONICLE 

"The South's Oldest Newspaper" 
+ — — ■■ — ■■ — ■■ — ■■ — ■■ — ■■ — ■■ — ■" — ■■ — ■■ — ■• — ■— + 



Pictures in this Annual 



Made By 

TOMMINS 



852 Broad St. Phone 2314 



Child (at theater): "Papa, why <hie.s that detective make siiili a funny face?" 
Fatlier: "Hush dear, he has ])r<»hahly Just snielled a rat." 

Mead waiter: "Did you find ynur luncli, sir?" 

Patron: "I liad a hard joh, hut I finally found it lu-liind tlu- salt cellar. 

'I'hey called the Hivir "}Iesj)eriis." It was a wreck. 



Phone 2287 Room 408 



HAVE YOUR BEAUTY BEAUTIFIED AT THE ! 

LEONARD BEAUTY SHOPPE j 

• THE SMARTEST SHOPPE IN TOWN. * |